uranyl sulfate


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uranyl sulfate

[′yu̇r·ə‚nil ′səl‚fāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
UO2SO4·3½H2 O and UO2SO4·3H2O Poisonous, radioactive yellow crystals; soluble in water and concentrated hydrochloric acid; used as an analytical reagent. Also known as uranium sulfate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A fluorescent substance both he and his father had been interested in was potassium uranyl sulfate. In February 1896 Becquerel wrapped photographic film in black paper and put it in sunlight with a crystal of potassium uranyl sulfate upon it.
One of those who followed up instantly on Becquerel's discovery of the radiation from potassium uranyl sulfate (see 1896) was a Polish-born French chemist, Marie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934).