ureilite

ureilite

[yə′rē·ə‚līt]
(geology)
An achondritic stony meteorite consisting principally of olivine and clinobronzite, with some nickel-iron, troilite, diamond, and graphite.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study backs that theory and "provides convincing evidence that the ureilite parent body was one such large 'lost' planet before it was destroyed by collisions some 4.5 billion years ago," the authors of the study noted.
A paper titled "A large planetary body inferred from diamond inclusions in a ureilite meteorite" details the observation and analysis of the meteorites and is published in the journal (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03808-6) Nature Communications  on April 17.
(2008) 'In situ micro-Raman and X-ray diffraction study of diamonds and petrology of the new ureilite UAE 001 from the United Arab Emirates.' Meteoritics & Planetary Sciences 43.7: 1127-1136.
We have not yet identified any other parent asteroids with as much certainty, but we know from their composition that the Aubrites and the Ureilite meteorites are rocks from the mantles of two different asteroids that had violently explosive eruptions, which ejected what should have become their crustal rocks into space at escape velocity.
Recently a NASA scientist was asked by an American broker (not Haag) to analyze a rare ureilite stone of "unknown origin." However, its composition matched that of another ureilite known to come from the Nullarbor Plain, and characteristic traces of sand on the exterior only heightened suspicion that the specimen had been illegally imported from Australia.
"[TC.sub.3]'s meteorites are largely ureilites, a weird set of rocks from a body that melted and was then blown to smithereens a few million years after it formed," says geochemist Ed Scott (University of Hawai'i).
"But it's got more plagioclase (an aluminum containing mineral) than they're seeing on the surface of Mercury and it plots funny in 'oxygen isotope space.' It's plotting in a region of oxygen isotope space where we've never had meteorite data points before-except for a few ureilites, which also have oddball chemistry," he said.
Their analyses revealed that the fallen stones belong to a rare meteorite class known as ureilites, dark carbon-enriched rocks that were once at least partly molten.