urinal


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urinal

urinal (wall hung)
A sanitary fixture equipped with a water supply and drain for flushing away urine.
References in periodicals archive ?
These urinals do not require water to eliminate urine, the Jetrinse Solution Technology automatically purges the housing and pipes, rinsing them thoroughly to prevent the buildup of sediment every 72 hours.
He further said: "The urinal's ceramic surface is quick and easy to clean and has no awkward nooks and crannies or mounting holes for dirt to gather, while even the siphon of the siphonic urinal has an easy-to-clean ceramic cover.
Despite being offered as a freebie, one CTO employee welcomed the urinal advert, suggesting that the "captive audience" might have worked in Cyprus' favour.
The urinal was similar to others once dotted around Birmingham, including one that survives today outside the Jewellery Quarter railway station.
Waterless urinals is one of the latest appliances that government departments and private companies are now going for to save water.
The maintenance cost only involves periodic changing of the cartridge and quick cleanup as with traditional urinals.
The new interior of the urinal also prevents water from splashing over the edge during flushing.
Because water-free urinal bowls are dry, they harbor five times fewer bacteria than a flush urinal.
Colette Brooks spent two years and $500,000 greening her Malibu home with solar panels, a recycled metal roof, organic linens and a waterless urinal.
The urinal contains a specially positioned picture of a small bee, designed to draw users' aim towards it.
Now flushing is unnecessary with the arrival of the waterless urinal in Oregon.
In place of what Varnedoe and Gopnik dismissed as the "sublime lack of curiosity" characterizing such theoretically framed approaches, "High & Low" sought to examine "particulars"--to ask just what kind of urinal Marcel Duchamp chose for his infamous 1917 Fountain (in "Advertising"), or who had made the pulp tales from which Roy Lichtenstein borrowed in his early Pop paintings ("Comics"), or precisely what papers Picasso was reading in Paris in 1912 ("Words").