use


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

use

1. Christianity a distinctive form of liturgical or ritual observance, esp one that is traditional in a Church or group of Churches
2. the enjoyment of property, land, etc., by occupation or by deriving revenue or other benefit from it
3. Law the beneficial enjoyment of property the legal title to which is held by another person as trustee
4. Law an archaic word for trust
5. Philosophy logic linguistics the occurrence of an expression in such a context that it performs its own linguistic function rather than being itself referred to. In "Fido" refers to Fido, the name Fido is used only on the second occurrence, first being mentioned

Use

 

(pol’zovanie), in law, one of the basic legal rights of a property owner. The right of use consists in the right to the productive or personal use of an object for the satisfaction of one’s needs and interests, depending on the nature of the object, for example, use of property or receipt of income from an object. Limits to use are set by law, contract, or other legal document, such as a will. Use is forbidden if it is detrimental to other individuals (abuse of the right). Legal use may be protected from infringement by various legal means, in particular, by bringing a suit for the elimination of impediments to use.

USE

(language)
An early system on the IBM 1130.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959].
References in classic literature ?
em as low and cruel to each other as they can be; there's no use in your suffering to keep from hurting them.
I now use them as ornamental statuary in my garden.
You will have to do most of the talking," said Ojo, "for Unc is called the Silent One and uses few words.
The essence of language lies, not in the use of this or that special means of communication, but in the employment of fixed associations (however these may have originated) in order that something now sensible--a spoken word, a picture, a gesture, or what not--may call up the "idea" of something else.
We commonly imagine, when we use a proper name, that we mean one definite entity, the particular individual who was called "Napoleon.
We may say that a person understands a word when (a) suitable circumstances make him use it, (b) the hearing of it causes suitable behaviour in him.
To say that a word has a meaning is not to say that those who use the word correctly have ever thought out what the meaning is: the use of the word comes first, and the meaning is to be distilled out of it by observation and analysis.
The relation of a word to its meaning is of the nature of a causal law governing our use of the word and our actions when we hear it used.
1) On suitable occasions you use the word properly.
But so far we have only considered what may be called the "demonstrative" use of language, to point out some feature in the present environment.
The words alone, without the use of images, may cause appropriate emotions and appropriate behaviour.
These two ways of using words, including their occurrence in inner speech, may be spoken of together as the use of words in "thinking.