useful load

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useful load

The difference between the maximum allowable weight of the aircraft and its empty weight. The useful load includes the weight of the occupants, baggage, any cargo, useful fuel, and drainable oil.
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So I agree the A5 was designed on recreation and not to compete in the "GA" market of aircraft capable of larger fuel and useful loads for long cross-country flights.
Like Premier's Dakota redo, these have useful loads in the 1150- to 1200-pound range.
In the Skylane line, that gets you into the Q and R models, which have similar useful loads, but probably just a bit less than the Dakota in the real world.
Factory numbers gave it a useful load of 1392 pounds and even if it was 100 pounds less in the real world, it could still carry full fuel and four people with enough payload left for reasonable baggage.
Our experience is that such data can be a trifle optimistic, especially when it comes to cruise speeds and useful loads. We urge prospective buyers to confirm actual empty weights of delivered airplanes, as cabin payload with full fuel is almost always tight on small turboprops.
Generally, until the airframe reaches the size of a TBM 850, it's difficult to find enough space to carry sufficient fuel to get practicalrange out of a turbine-powered airplane with any useful load left for carrying people.
Starting at the speedy end, the Cessna 210 is probably the best compromise of load and speed, with many models offering useful loads in the 1500-pound range.
(Tur-bonormalizing will do this for an A36, with a gross weight bump as a bonus.) Useful loads in the A36TC drop to the 1200-pound range.
This limit is so restrictive that few LSAs have reasonable useful loads. To be functional, I think a two-seat airplane should have enough carrying capacity to put two adult males and enough fuel for three or four hours flying in them.