ligament

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Related to uterosacral ligament: pubocervical ligament, cardinal ligament

ligament

(lĭg`əmənt), strong band of white fibrous connective tissueconnective tissue,
supportive tissue widely distributed in the body, characterized by large amounts of intercellular substance and relatively few cells. The intercellular material, or matrix, is produced by the cells and gives the tissue its particular character.
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 that joins bones to other bones or to cartilage in the joint areas. The bundles of collagenous fibers that form ligaments tend to be pliable but not elastic. They therefore permit freedom of movement within a certain limited range while holding the attached bones firmly in place. For example, the ligaments at the knee limit the movement of the lower leg to a certain range. Other types of ligaments form fibrous sheets that support such internal organs as the kidneys and the spleen.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Ligament

A strong, flexible connective tissue band usually found between two bony prominences. Most ligaments are composed of dense fibrous tissue formed by parallel bundles of collagen fibers. They have a shining white appearance and are pliable, strong, and noncompliant. A second kind of ligament, composed either partly or almost entirely of yellow elastic fibers, is extensible or compliant, thereby allowing the connected bones to move apart. See Connective tissue, Joint (anatomy)

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Bioscience. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ligament

 

in man, a dense band or layer of fibrous tissue that connects skeletal bones or individual organs. Ligaments usually are found near joints and perform a variety of functions, depending on the movements in the joint. Joint capsules are strengthened by reinforcing ligaments, limited in their amplitude by inhibiting ligaments, and directed in their movements by directing ligaments. In many joints, ligaments act as passive bands whose attenuation impairs static functions and alters the shape of the corresponding elements of the skeleton. The main blood vessels that nourish bone pass through some ligaments. The microscopic structure of articular ligaments consists of a variety of dense fibrous tissue whose dominant elements are bands of collagenous and elastic fibers.

The term “ligament” is often applied to anatomic formations not associated with joints, for example, the ligaments of visceral organs, which consist of fine double layers of peritoneum.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ligament

[′lig·ə·mənt]
(engineering)
The section of solid material in a tube sheet or shell between adjacent holes.
(histology)
A flexible, dense white fibrous connective tissue joining, and sometimes encapsulating, the articular surfaces of bones.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ligament

Anatomy any one of the bands or sheets of tough fibrous connective tissue that restrict movement in joints, connect various bones or cartilages, support muscles, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The robotic approach to cervicovagina presacral uterosacral ligament suspension may be better than conventional laparoscopy because of the ease of suturing and of intracorporeal knot tying.
The data indicated an upregulated expression of Mfn2 in the POP fibroblasts that were directly obtained from the uterosacral ligament tissues (previous in vivo study).
Uterosacral ligament thickness of overactive bladder and control groups OAB group Control group p value (mean [+ or -] SD) (mean [+ or -] SD) Right USL thickness 2.04[+ or -]0.34 2.17[+ or -]0.47 0.71 (mm) Left USL thickness 2.04[+ or -]0.52 2.09[+ or -]0.51 0.206 (mm) Data are given as mean [+ or -] SD USL: Uterosacral ligament, OAB: Overactive bladder, SD: Standard deviation
Caption: FIGURE 2 Prolapse repair with uterosacral ligament suspension
The up middle point of the mesh was fixed onto the posterior wall of cervix or the apical posterior wall (in case of hysterectomy) and the bilateral uterosacral ligament, the two arms were sutured to bilateral sacrospinous ligaments.
Therefore, we conducted a study to compare the patterns of protein expression in the uterosacral ligament (USL) of women with POP with those in women with normal pelvic support.
A total of 186 underwent sacrospinous ligament fixation (SSLF), while 188 patients underwent uterosacral ligament suspension (ULS).
In one study of 57 women with a surgical diagnosis of endometriosis, uterosacral ligament abnormalities, lateral displacement of the cervix, and cervical stenosis were observed in 47%, 28%, and 19% of the women, respectively.
(12) In laparoscopic surgery, especially during hysterectomy surgery, injuries mainly occur in the area of the uterosacral ligaments (Grainger et.
A suture of # 2-0 Ethibond is placed into each retroperitoneal uterosacral ligament as it attaches to the sacral periosteum at the level of S-2 or S-3--a retroperitoneal uterosacral colpopexy.
I massage the uterosacral ligament for about 10 seconds to lengthen it and create more descensus, then place a Ballantine Heaney clamp on the ligament.
To lower the risk of posthysterectomy prolapse, I include in my angle sutures the uterosacral ligament, vaginal mucosa, and anterior pericervical fascia.