vagility


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vagility

[və′jil·əd·ē]
(ecology)
The ability of organisms to disseminate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new migration study was made possible by Movebank, a global repository of scientific research on animal movement that has cast much new light on vagility.
In fact, T has also been related to capabilities that might involve better probabilities for males to survive, enhance their self-defense and gathering of territory and mates, as well as their reproductive success, such as vagility, spatial ability, dominance rank, and aggressiveness (Christian 1971, vom Saal 1987, Gipps 1982, Perrot-Sinal et al.
Few studies to date have tested the functionality of either the LAR or CTZ in marine species with greater dispersal potential or vagility as adults, but notable examples include studies of rockfishes of the family Scorpaenidae (e.
These findings suggest that flea vagility and/or fecundity may increase just prior to, or during, epizootics.
The main reasons for this community profile are vagility, behaviour, physiology and feeding habits of the hosts as well as phylogenetic specificity and possible interactions between parasites (Luque et al.
Although it is possible that this pattern is due, at least in part, to sampling error (diseases associated with anthropophilic species would be the first to come to our attention), the pattern could be the logical consequence of several characteristics of opportunistic species (high vagility, rapid growth, early reproduction, high fecundity, and capacity to sustain high population densities that are conducive to the transmission of pathogens) that would facilitate the evolution and maintenance of pathogens.
viatica group of species was central to consolidate White's ideas on chromosomal speciation and eventually led to his formulation of the stasipatric model (White 1968, 1978), applicable to organisms of low vagility in which chromosomal rearrangements play a central role in speciation without geographic isolation.
Scincella lateralis makes a sound experimental subject due to the species' abundance, small size, and limited vagility.
Two key features make them useful for those purposes: their low vagility and a close dependence on environmental conditions, mainly humidity (Acosta 2002; Pinto-da-Rocha et al.
turcicus nests are often found in boxes of old paper, drawers of cabinets, and piles of old clothing; he postulated that because of low individual vagility, eggs may be the species primary form of dispersal.