vagility


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vagility

[və′jil·əd·ē]
(ecology)
The ability of organisms to disseminate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A majority of lecithotrophic sea slug species are found in warmer, nutrient-poor waters, where having a short-lived, non-feeding larval stage can lead to reductions in larval mortality at the cost of reduced fecundity and vagility (Goddard 2004; Goddard and Hermosillo 2008).
The new migration study was made possible by Movebank, a global repository of scientific research on animal movement that has cast much new light on vagility. Records of where animals move can be shared with other researchers, and combined with data on vegetative cover, elevations and temperature, anywhere on the globe, from Nasa and other sources.
gigas is a species characterized by high vagility during its different ontogenetic states (e.g., egg masses, paralarvae and adults) and is potentially an ecological opportunist.
Bats may serve as important indicators of climate change due to their vagility and temperature-regulated physiology.
cinerea in the middle Mississippi Valley, including its recent colonization of southwestern Indiana, demonstrates the remarkable vagility of this species.
Their biological characteristics, such as small populations, lentic habits, low vagility, and hence reduced gene flow, render them as excellent models for chromosome studies among fish.
Blacktip Sharks, compared with Atlantic Sharpnose Sharks, may show higher vagility when faced with a patchy prey environment.
Members of the Family Canidae are usually characterised by high mobility and vagility, ethological characteristics that result in low levels of geographical genetic differentiation (Dalen et al., 2005; Iyengar et al., 2005; Tchaicka et al., 2006).
These findings suggest that flea vagility and/or fecundity may increase just prior to, or during, epizootics.
Although it is possible that this pattern is due, at least in part, to sampling error (diseases associated with anthropophilic species would be the first to come to our attention), the pattern could be the logical consequence of several characteristics of opportunistic species (high vagility, rapid growth, early reproduction, high fecundity, and capacity to sustain high population densities that are conducive to the transmission of pathogens) that would facilitate the evolution and maintenance of pathogens.
viatica group of species was central to consolidate White's ideas on chromosomal speciation and eventually led to his formulation of the stasipatric model (White 1968, 1978), applicable to organisms of low vagility in which chromosomal rearrangements play a central role in speciation without geographic isolation.