vagus

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vagus

[′vā·gəs]
(anatomy)
The tenth cranial nerve; either of a pair of sensory and motor nerves forming an important part of the parasympathetic system in vertebrates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gaul, "Noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation in the management of cluster headache: clinical evidence and practical experience," Therapeutic Advances in Neurological Disorders, vol.
Kong, "Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation: a promising method for treatment of autism spectrum disorders," Frontiers in Neuroscience, vol.
Classen, "Assessment of brainstem function with auricular branch of vagus nerve stimulation in Parkinson's disease," PLoS ONE, vol.
Szeles, "Modulation of muscle tone and sympathovagal balance in cervical dystonia using percutaneous stimulation of the auricular vagus nerve," Artificial Organs, vol.
Ackland says that he and his colleagues agree that the vagus nerve is important.
"Nobody should overpromise that the vagus nerve is the secret to everything," he says.
"Vagus nerve stimulation: from epilepsy to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway." Neurogastroenterology & Motility.
Caption: The vagus nerve's path from brain to heart and other organs was detailed by the Greek anatomist Galen, a leading physician of the Roman Empire in the second century.
Patients with vagus nerve stimulators should avoid strong magnets and may not undergo MRI imaging unless unless a special head coil is used and the pacemaker is turned off.
The vagus nerve stimulator is widely used in patients with intractable epilepsy who are not candidates for epilepsy surgery.
People with intractable epilepsy and their families should ask their epilepsy team about the possibility of using a vagus nerve stimulator to help control their seizures.
Many patients with vagus nerve stimulators are unable to speak.