valetudinarian


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Related to valetudinarian: viticetum

valetudinarian

, valetudinary
1. a person who is or believes himself to be chronically sick; invalid
2. a person excessively worried about the state of his health; hypochondriac
References in periodicals archive ?
There goes in the world a notion that the scholar should be a recluse, a valetudinarian.
His mother, Juliet, was early a valetudinarian and on the fringe of his life; his father, Junius, was the dominant force, a man of rectitude, if sparing in warmth for a son of delicate health -- but also an erratic disposition that today would probably be diagnosed as manic-depressive.
Established in comfortable seclusion at Down, he tended his chronically precarious health, kept in touch with a large and far-flung circle of scientific colleagues, paced contemplatively around his beloved Sandwalk (a landscape garden equivalent to a monastery's cloisters), welcomed visitors, ventured forth to London exhibits and lectures or to valetudinarian stints at hydropathic spas--and produced a staggering array of scientific studies.
His wife became increasingly valetudinarian and estranged, lived apart from him, died and was buried at the villa she built in San Remo.
There is something valetudinarian about her, forever ailing, self-absorbed, given to reclusive periods, writing dramatic descriptions of her inner suffering.
It is perhaps surprising, then, to find precisely such bonds operating in Stoddard's own "Collected by a Valetudinarian.
Gissing's undoubtedly well-founded valetudinarian tendencies continue in this volume with a truly Victorian tenaciousness.
With their anachronistic and bookish air, Lamb's essays have traditionally been viewed as quaint, somewhat quirky exercises in valetudinarian impressionism, retrospective and inward-turning, celebrating the past, especially the past of childhood.
The transformation from a vital, active, daring, and energetic young man into a valetudinarian at the age of thirty is paralleled in the development of his thought.
Woodress notes Cather's increasingly valetudinarian attitude from 1922 on, her disillusionment with the postwar Jazz Age, the callousness of prosperity--stingy, grasping, extravagant--and the lazy descendants of earlier generations (335-36).
She is further restricted by her valetudinarian father's gentle selfishness, which resists any kind of change and permits a social life limited to his own small circle, exclusive to the degree of admitting only four people as his closest acquaintances and only three to the second group.
Woodhouse was always "a nervous man" (6) and "a valetudinarian .