valley

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valley

1. a long depression in the land surface, usually containing a river, formed by erosion or by movements in the earth's crust
2. the broad area drained by a single river system
3. the junction of a roof slope with another or with a wall
4. relating to or proceeding by way of a valley

Valley

The lower trough or gutter formed by the intersection of two inclined planes of a roof.

What does it mean when you dream about a valley?

Dreaming about a valley can represent everything from fertility (a valley is a symbol of female sexuality) to depression and “feeling down.”

valley

[′val·ē]
(building construction)
An inside angle formed where two sloping sides intersect.
(geography)
A generally broad area of flat, low-lying land bordered by higher ground.
(geology)
A relatively shallow, wide depression of the sea floor with gentle slopes. Also known as submarine valley.

valley

The trough or gutter formed by the intersection of two inclined planes of a roof.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lesion en la vallecula derecha (asterisco amarillo), epiglotis (asterisco verde), base de la lengua (asterisco azul)
4) We believe, like others, that laryngeal preservation is possible as long as the vallecula and pre-epiglottic space are free of disease.
Both operators, who had failed digital intubation, had short fingers and they could hardly touch the vallecula of patient's tongue.
While computed tomography scan is helpful in delineating the cyst location and extent in relation to the base of the tongue, vallecula and thyroid gland (3), it also helps to plan the optimal route of passage of the endotracheal tube or fibreoptic bronchoscope.
Physical examination showed bilateral parotid and submandibular swelling, and fiberoptic laryngoscopy showed pharyngolaryngeal edema and edema of the epiglottis, vallecula, and the right arytenoid region (figure 1, B).
Imaging findings include normal sized posterior fossa, keyhole configuration of fourth ventricle communicating with a prominent cistern magna through a widely patent vallecula, varying degrees of vermian hypoplasia (Figure 2).
Appropriate positioning of the patient's head and placement of the Macintosh laryngoscope blade tip in the vallecula to optimise glottic exposure are considered crucial by many anaesthetists.
Indirect laryngoscopy showed ulceroproliferative growth in base of tongue, left vallecula and left supraglottis.
This is particularly true for larger tumors that obscure the surrounding landmarks such as the vallecula and epiglottis.
The aim is to introduce the tip into the vallecula and then elevate the epiglottis by suspending it.
We instilled 10% lignocaine over base of tongue, vallecula, glottis to suppress pressure response to the laryngoscopy and intubation.
The tip of the epiglottis and vallecula must be clearly identified.