valuation

(redirected from valuational)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

valuation

[‚val·yə′wā·shən]
(mathematics)
A scalar function of a field which has properties similar to those of absolute value.
References in periodicals archive ?
216) With these valuational parameters in mind, assume now that the law changes the liability regime.
If, however, MV sits atop of our agent's valuational hierarchy, then it would be irrational to frustrate this higher value in order to avoid the aforementioned lesser costs.
Therefore, she suggests that in an ideal-typical situation, we could place the primary harm against the collectivity of despised sexualities to the cultural valuational structure, thereby proffering the remedy of recognition: revaluation and according positive recognition to gay and lesbian communities.
The spatial osmosis between marginalized periphery and opulent centre epitomizes a valuational problem:
These doctrines sometimes retain not only the epistemological but also the valuational connotation of ideal and idealism, indicating that reality somehow is, shares, or reflects perfection.
Our valuational paradigm shift will become focused on providing enough food, water, shelter, healthcare, education, security, spiritual and cultural opportunities, etc.
People in official positions occupy multiple valuational worlds.
I mention this here because such a view is in a certain sense simply a consequent extension of Audi's substantive foundationalism about practical reason: an extension in which "moral" qualities such as kindness and respect are just as fundamental as the qualities involved in Audi's eudaemonisuc, hedonic, and valuational principles.
Despite his sensitivity to the relativity of valuational perspectives, Emerson does not end in complete relativity; he retains his respect for the higher, the ideal good that ought to prevail in the world.
This modified model employs the same six phases and identifies four classes of "factors or forces" that make up the policy dynamic: biophysical (physical properties of the resource), valuational (human values about the resource), social-structural (property rights and access to the resource), and institutional-regulatory (organizations and their directives).
But Mill rejected this valuational 1eveling, insisting that pleasures differ in quality as well as quantity: Activities that engage individuals' higher faculties are infinitely preferable to mere bodily enjoyments.
Therefore, for Simon, in order to achieve `correct' decision making for the effective design of administrative organisations, it was very important to make a distinction between the factual and the valuational aspects of decision making.