vampire bat


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to vampire bat: Common Vampire Bat

vampire bat,

name for the blood-drinking batsbat,
winged mammal of the order Chiroptera, which includes 900–1,000 species classified in about 200 genera and 17 families. Bats range in size from a wingspread of over 5 ft (150 cm) to a wingspread of less than 2 in. (5 cm).
..... Click the link for more information.
 of the family Desmodontidae, found in the New World tropics. Vampire bats feed exclusively on the blood of living animals and are thus the only true parasites among mammals. There are three species ranging from Argentina to N Mexico. They are small (about 3 in./7.5 cm long), round-bodied bats with large, pointed ears and naked snouts. Unlike most bats, vampire bats can walk on all fours with the body lifted off the ground; it is in this manner that they approach their sleeping prey. The bat uses its razor-sharp incisors to make a neat incision, usually without waking the victim, then laps the blood with its tongue. Its saliva contains an anticoagulant that causes the wound to seep for several hours. Vampire bats parasitize a variety of animals, chiefly mammals. Although the quantity of blood they take is insufficent to harm a large animal, they are dangerous to livestock and humans because they transmit serious diseases such as rabies and Chagas's disease. Vampire bats live in caves, tree hollows, and houses. They are mutual groomers, and an effective method of reducing their numbers is to coat a captured bat with a sticky poison and release it; when the bat returns to its roost the poison will be licked by other bats. Members of another bat family, the Megadermatidae, of the Old World tropics, are known as false vampire bats. They are exclusively carnivorous but do not feed on blood. The generic name Vampyrus belongs to a large, fruit-eating bat of Central and South America that was once mistakenly believed to suck blood. True vampire bats are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Chiroptera, family Desmodontidae.

vampire bat

any bat, esp Desmodus rotundus, of the family Desmodontidae of tropical regions of Central and South America, having sharp incisor and canine teeth and feeding on the blood of birds and mammals
References in periodicals archive ?
This guarantees that the vampire bat can keep feeding on the same victim.
Samples were selected on the basis of identification of vampire bat or any other bat-associated rabies virus variant by using a panel of 8 monoclonal antibodies, as described (12).
Further, it has been reported in Mexico that the bat variant in vampire bats has been found at higher elevations of the mountains due to an increase in average air temperature.
On a good night, a vampire bat will consume 50 percent of its body weight in blood.
The false vampire bat Vampyrum spectrum in Oaxaca, Mexico.
Molecular analysis of urban rabies case from vampire bat in Corrientes, Argentina
Desmoteplase, a plasminogen activator derived from a protein in vampire bat saliva, has a high fibrin specificity, is not activated by [beta]-amyloid and has a long terminal half-life.
Karen Gajewski's "Worth Noting" column in the May/June Humanist suggests that an increase in vampire bat attacks on humans in Brazil may be owing to deforestation.
Since a single wing wouldn't get anything off the ground, the referent to "wing"--of a vampire bat or scavenger bird--flies away, leaving only a strange form.
True, there are vampire bat species, but most of these feed on native animals or livestock, and rarely pose a threat to people.
A vampire bat drinks one meal a night, and missing just three nights in a row would probably kill the animal, Carter says.
Body contacts among the social groups in the False Vampire bat, Megaderma lyra, suggests individualized relationships.