vapor-liquid separation

vapor-liquid separation

[′vā·pər ′lik·wəd ‚sep·ə′rā·shən]
(chemical engineering)
The removal of liquid droplets from a flowing stream of gas or vapor; accomplished by impingement, cyclonic action, and absorption or adsorption operations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Different from a traditional multi-pass condenser which starts from the top and ends at the bottom, the separation condenser is designed to have vapor-liquid separation in the vertical second header.
While maldistribution exists as a problem, it provides a possibility for creating vapor-liquid separation. Meanwhile, two-phase distribution can also be improved by first separating the liquid and vapor then sending them to separated passes, since single-phase flow after separation has more uniform properties than a two-phase flow.
The theoretical rationale behind the advantages of a condenser with vapor-liquid separation is following.
This paper experimentally investigates refrigerant R134a vapor-liquid separation in vertical impacting T-junctions and parametric effects on liquid separation performance.
The vertical branch diameter of a T-junction also affects the vapor-liquid separation performance.