varve


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varve,

in geology, pair of thin sedimentary layers formed annually by seasonal climatic changes. Usually found in glacial lake deposits, varves consist of a coarse-grained, light-colored summer deposit and a finer-grained, dark-colored winter deposit formed when fine sediment settles out from the water under the ice cover. Varves, and the pollen they contain, are useful for interpreting recent climatic history.

varve

[′värv]
(geology)
A sedimentary bed, layer, or sequence of layers deposited in a body of still water within a year's time, and usually during a season. Also known as glacial varve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in varve character between laminated glaciolacustrine deposits in the northern and central parts of the lake point to different sedimentation environments.
Eleven years ago, in 1999, the last specific meeting for the 'varve community' was held in the Lammi Biological Station in Finland.
The fine article by Gregg Davidson and Ken Wolgemuth explains how we can have confidence in age dating, based on comparisons of independent data sets ("Testing and Verifying Old Age Evidence: Lake Suigetsu Varves, Tree Rings, and Carbon-14," PSCF 70, no.
Comparing the varves with the ice cores from Greenland - they are a good record of ancient atmospheric conditions, including volcanic explosions - showed that the thicker varve layers happened in the years of heightened explosive volcanic activity.
Anderson, R.Y.: 1993, The varve chronometer in Elk Lake record of climatic variability and evidence for solar-geomagnetic-14C-climate connection.
Estimating the duration of ancestral lake Erie using varve analysis at and above the Warren stage in northwest Ohio.
5) as sediment becomes finer and well-laminated showing 'varve'-like couplets of alternating grain size and colour.
There also appears to be a general trend towards increased aridity in the mid to late Holocene, as supported by data extracted from coral, foraminifera, varve, lake and sea-bottom sediments from sites in Australia and the circum-Pacific region (e.g.
There does appear to be a general regional trend toward increased aridity in the mid to late Holocene, as supported by data extracted from coral, foraminifera, varve, lake and sea bottom sediments from sites in the Australian and circum-Pacific region (Brookfield and Allan 1989; Hope and Golson 1995; Kershaw 1995; Kim et al.
'varve 'Farben' aber 'jarvi 'Seen' und 'leibu 'Brote'.