varved clay

varved clay

[′värvd ‚klā]
(geology)
A lacustrine sediment of distinct layers consisting of varves. Also known as varve clay.

varved clay

Alternating thin layers of silt (or fine sand) and clay formed by variations in sedimentation during the various seasons of the year, often exhibiting contrasting colors when partially dried.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the master core (S-2009) basal sandy silt (till) is overlain by reddish-brown varved clay (core depth 745-708 cm) in which 29 annual varves were identified (Fig.
Comments: The site is on a deep varved clay deposit (Connecticut Valley Varved Clay) on the University of Massachusetts, Amherst campus.
Consequently, the formation of bottom deposits may have been influenced by currents and wave activity, but the erosion areas are located near the deposition area--inside the bay (till and varved clay exposed on the seafloor) or on bordering peninsulas (bedrock).
Within 1.5 km north of the city boundary, 2-3 m thick lenses of varved clay were found in the lower part of the sand layer.
Fine sand, silt, and varved clay, typical of ice lakes, facilitated drawing up the contours of ancient lakes (Fig.
Studies of varved clays in West Virginia by Janssen and McCoy (1953) placed the minimum duration of Lake Tight at 6,500 years.
Van Asch, "Factors controlling the movement of a landslide in varved clays near La Mure (French Alps)," Bulletin de la Societe Geologique de France, vol.