vasa vasorum


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vasa vasorum

[′vā·zə va′sȯr·əm]
(anatomy)
The blood vessels supplying the walls of arteries and veins.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vrachatis et al., "Quantitative analysis of carotid plaque vasa vasorum by CEUS and correlation with histology after endarterectomy," Vasa, vol.
Vasa vasorum in atherosclerotic coronary arteries: Responses to vasoactive stimuli and regression of atherosclerosis.
(42) Proliferation of vasa vasorum into the intima may make plaques more vulnerable to rupture and inflammation.
Rodriguez-Porcel et al., "Coronary vasa vasorum neovascularization precedes epicardial endothelial dysfunction in experimental hypercholesterolemia," Cardiovascular Research, vol.
In these areas, neovascularization developed by sprouting angiogenesis from adventitial vasa vasorum invades progressively the atherosclerotic area and takes part in the progression of lesions and complications observed in unstable plaques, such as hemorrhages and rupture [4-7, 47].
In addition, this study showed the formation of the vasa vasorum in the space between the CES and the vein grafts, suggesting that oxygen and nutrients could be supplied for the vein graft, and hypoxia-induced pathological changes could be alleviated [11].
The actual cause of the phenomenon of stunning and hibernation is "unknown" in evidence-based medicine, but glucotoxicity of the microcirculation in the corresponding capillary bed of the heart muscle or the vasa vasorum (or microcirculation) of the macrovessel arterial wall may be involved.
Subsequently ischemic changes caused by the injured vasa vasorum and tunica adventitia fibrosis may induce large vessel rupture and PAP formation.
In addition, the tunica adventitia of large arteries and veins contains a system of vessels, called vasa vasorum, that supply blood to the vascular walls themselves, as well as a network of autonomic nerves, called nervi vascularis, that control contraction of the smooth muscle in the vessel walls.
(2) The dissection of the coronary artery wall in ECM has been postulated to be due to the disruption of the vasa vasorum, which also explains the presence of hemorrhage between tunica adventitia and tunica media that displaces the inner artery wall toward the lumen.
There has been a slow but relentless interest in the role of the vasa vasorum, the anatomy of their origins, and their branch distribution due to their possible role in atherogenesis [1, 2], coronary interventions [3, 4], and in response to risk factors for atherosclerosis [5, 6].