veery


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veery:

see thrushthrush,
bird, common name for members of the Turdidae, a large family of birds found in most parts of the world and noted for their beautiful song. The majority are modestly colored, with spotted underparts, in either the young or the adult stage, although some have bright
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References in periodicals archive ?
Between mid-May and early July 2013 and 2014, Veery nests were located using adult behaviors to delineate territories and systematically searching the understory vegetation.
We thank Stephen Jones, Roseli Pimentel, Odirlei Fonseca, and Octavio Campos Salles for the correct identification of the Veery. The first author would like to thank CAPES (Coordenacao de Aperfeicoamento de Nivel superior) for support their research in the Ecological Station of Tapacura.
Table 4: Derivatives of Veery (CM 33027- KVZ/BUH//KAL/BB) released in different parts of the world (Skovmand et al., 1997)
Most remarkable was the May 18 recapture of a veery, which we had originally banded there on May 12, 2007, when she was at least a year old.
A Demographic Study of a Small Population of Veery (Catharus fuscescens), in a Central Michigan Woodlot.
All other hosts with >10 individuals tested, including opossums, gray and red squirrels, and all 4 species of birds tested (veery [Catharus fuscescens], gray catbird [Dumetella carolinensis], wood thrush [Hylocichia mustelina], and American robin), had mean levels of reservoir competence <6%.
The narrowest observed elevational ranges were generally evident in a handful of species that are restricted to relatively low (for example, Belted Kingfisher, Willow Flycatcher, Red-eyed Vireo, Veery, Brown-headed Cowbird) or relatively high (for example, Clark's Nutcracker, Horned Lark, Mountain Bluebird, American Pipit) habitats in the parks.
(53.) Longingly immense very veery fence 240 Line 3--We are what
First photographic evidence of Veery (Catharus fuscescens) for Peru.
While the market for single-aisle aircraft in the Middle East will account for 47 per cent of the new aircraft over the 20-year period, twin-aisle aircraft will account for 43 per cent (compared to 25 per cent globally), followed by veery large aircraft such as the Boeing 747 that will account for seven per cent, and regional jets, which will account for the remaining three per cent, according to Boeing.
Quine soberly and succinctly relates the outrage and alarm he shared with his colleagues, "with two rather vacillating exceptions." When Pivcevic asks who, Quine respectfully declines: "De mortuis nihil nisi bonum." In a 1993 interview with Veery, we see Quine's patient silence allow the interviewer to clarify poorly asked questions.