vegetable tanning

vegetable tanning

[′vej·tə·bəl ′tan·iŋ]
(engineering)
Leather tanning using plant extracts, such as tannic acid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mineral tanning involves the leather being treated with agents such as chromium, aluminium, zirconium, titanium and iron salts while in vegetable tanning oak and spruce bark is commonly used.
The leather, treated in the Old World, organic process of vegetable tanning, to embed each surface with its unique character."
Keeping to the natural texture of the leather and the confines of industrial efficiency and largely mechanization, the vegetable tanning process is done in pit tanks with 160 different concentrations of vegetable tannins and pickled.
Manufactured with 100% leather, the bags are detailed with finishes from vegetable tanning and customized colors, resulting in unique shades and tones.
Brave Leather uses natural vegetable tanning processes.
"Reports have been received about the import of arecanut as a vegetable tanning agent under duty exemption schemes.
Environmental Protection Agency details two types of leather tanning: vegetable tanning, which is the oldest tanning process, and chrome tanning, which makes up 90% of tanning production in the U.S.
It has been used in the leather industry for almost 100 years and when it was introduced as an alternative to vegetable tanning extracts from oak bark and similar sources, it heralded a new era for the leather industry.
N Mohammed Sayeed, SSC undertakes vegetable tanning of raw hides (goat skin) to produce finished leather.
Chrome tanning (including unhairing, decliming, pickling, tanning, retanning, dyeing, and lubricating) can be done in a day; vegetable tanning can take weeks.