vegetative propagation


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vegetative propagation,

the ability of plants to reproduce without sexual reproduction, by producing new plants from existing vegetative structures. Some plants, such as the Canada thistle and most bamboos, send out long underground stems that produce new plants, often at considerable distances from the original plant. Such plants can form enormous colonies of new plants within a relatively few years. Many trees, such as the beech and aspen, send up root sprouts, and large colonies of new trees thus arise. In other trees, the lower branches may produce roots where they rest upon the ground, and new trees are produced. The leaves of some plants produce buds at their edges, which develop in turn into miniature plants that fall off and take root. Specialists in the fields of agriculture and horticulture take advantage of the regenerative ability of plants through such techniques as the rooting of cuttings; grafting and budding of fruit trees; layering, or inducing the tips of branches to produce new plants; the cutting apart of clusters of perennialsperennial,
any plant that under natural conditions lives for several to many growing seasons, as contrasted to an annual or a biennial. Botanically, the term perennial applies to both woody and herbaceous plants (see stem) and thus includes numerous members of the kingdom.
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, such as rhubarb, into individual plants; the cutting of plants (such as the common potato) into pieces that are then planted separately, each with a bud ("eye"); and numerous other techniques. The vegetative propagation of economically important and useful plants is now so widespread that most horticultural varieties are now only reproduced clonally, especially since many of them breed true from seed.

vegetative propagation

[′vej·ə‚tād·iv ‚präp·ə′gā·shən]
(botany)
Production of a new plant from a portion of another plant, such as a stem or branch.
References in periodicals archive ?
The possibility of vegetative propagation by leaf segment culture in Phalaenopsis and Vanda.
Vegetative parthenocarpy arises through a genetic mutation and can be transmitted to progeny through seed, as well as via vegetative propagation (Saleeb 1965; Storey 1975; Awamura et al.
The company believes that growing superior trees on its lands produced through cost-effective vegetative propagation will provide a substantial return to the company.
The development of genetically engineered varieties of vines within the European Union has - in effect - been approved by the EU Council of Ministers, which has agreed detailed changes to the European directive on the marketing of material for the vegetative propagation of the vine.
I'm still thrilled by the miracle of vegetative propagation.
Another striking feature is that, contrary to popular belief, the extent of tea under vegetative propagation is as much as 55%, the share in respect of smallholdings being even higher at 70%.
However, the report cautions that only domesticated vetiver from South India- which produces no seeds and spreads by vegetative propagation - should be used, not the wild type from North India.
Trees raised from seeds require 7 to 12 years to yield fruit, but its quality is inferior and in contrast vegetative propagation by layering, budding and planting gives better results.
It is believed that somatic embryogenesis not only protects the genome from the ravages of time but also guards against unwanted genetic mutation during vegetative propagation.
Vegetative propagation, using infested corms or suckers, has disseminated this pest throughout the world.
In general, the advantages of vegetative propagation are the uniformity of forests, the adaptation of specific clones for production areas and the maximization of timber production in quantity and quality, as compared to forest plantations produced by seeds (seedlings) (GOULART; XAVIER, 2008; HARTMANN et al.