veil

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veil,

a feature of female costume from antiquity, especially in the East, where it was worn primarily to conceal the features. In modern times it is worn to enhance the face. The Egyptian woman of rank, after Muslim influence, wore a transparent white gauze veil; the Greek woman wore a linen veil over the back of her head; the Roman woman favored the beautiful palliolum, a veil that was arranged over the hair and fell to the shoulders. The Middle Ages saw an abundance of veils decorating the extravagant headdresses (see hathat,
headdress developed from the simple close-fitting cap and hood of antiquity. The first hat, which was distinguished as such by having a brim, was the felt petasus of the Greeks, which tied under the chin and was worn by travelers.
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) of the times. In England, during the reign of Elizabeth I, veils of a shawllike nature were fashionable, and it was at that time that the white bridal veil probably became popular in England. The black crepe veil has been worn for mourning since early times. The Spanish mantilla, usually a black or white triangular veil of blonde lace, is worn on the head and falling over the shoulders. The veils of nuns and nurses are patterned after the early forms of the veil. The 20th cent. brought forth a great variety of veils—from large veils worn during the early years of the automobile to delicate, decorative nose veils. The modern veil, of chiffon or net, is often embroidered or embossed. Veils have often had symbolic meanings—of modesty, of religious humility, of bondage. Only since c.1925 have Muslim women been allowed to remove their veils, long symbolic of their servile position. However, with the resurgence of Muslim fundamentalism in the 1980s, the veil was once again required in some Muslim nations.
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veil

[vāl]
(biology)
(meteorology)
A very thin cloud through which objects are visible.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

veil

1. the veil the life of a nun in a religious order and the obligations entailed by it
2. take the veil to become a nun
3. Botany a membranous structure, esp the thin layer of cells connecting the edge of a young mushroom cap with the stipe
4. Anatomy another word for caul
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The situation seems to be reversed in the case of veiled Muslim women living in non-Muslim countries; the veil makes them highly visible in the public sphere, which puts them under double pressure: on the one hand, they are subject to the community pressure since they are afraid to be rejected by their own group if they do not cover.
It also suggested refusing asylum or citizenship to full-face veiled women, considering coercion to wear face-covering veils as a reason for asylum requests, issuing a parliamentary resolution denouncing Muslim full-face veils and creating a national school of Islamic studies ("France MP's report backs Muslim face veil bans" 2010, Davies 2010a, Bremner 2010).
This is particularly true of veiling in cultures hostile to it: "[The veil] is a mark of inner strength, courage, and faith precisely because it is so misunderstood." Later chapters explore current trends in hijab-friendly fashion and intelligent cultural portrayals, highlighting additional forms of veiled empowerment.
The debate that started after several veiled presenters complained of having been banned from appearing on state TV and which basically took place on the social networking website Facebook demonstrated the division of Moroccan activists over the issue.
However, to think of veiled women as collectively submissive and repressed is erroneous.
Whatever non-Muslims may feel about this garment, it is surely a question of personal liberty as to whether a woman chooses to have her face veiled or not.
In addition to proposing the bill, Hollobone said he would refuse to hold meetings with veiled Muslim woman.
Nowhere in the Koran does it say that women should be veiled. Yes, it says they should be covered, but not veiled.
Supporters of a ban say civil servants need a law to allow them to turn away fully veiled women who cannot be identified when they seek municipal services such as medical care, child support or public transport.
Kessler argues that the made-up face, veiled in rice powder and rouge, could achieve that ideal form: "[The] face could thus be reconstituted beneath layers of pulverized powder, fabrics, light, and shadow, produced as a kind of canvas, as a site for manufacturing the illusion of youthful beauty." (p.
Out of curiosity, I asked my father the reason these criminals veiled their faces.
Composed of seven articles including "Ellipsis and Hyperbolism in Arab Rhetoric" and "The Quintessential Esoterism of Islam", Sufism Veil and Quintessence presents Schuon's crucial distinction between an "absolute" Islam and a "contingent" Islam, examining differences between the message of Islam itself and the pious Arab expressions of that message, which tend to be veiled beneath rhetorical style.