sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
Rheolytic catheter and thrombolysis of dural venous sinus thrombosis: A case series.
The venous sinus is a cavity formed between the endosteal and meningeal layers of the dura.
Computed tomography (CT) of the head is generally the first diagnostic tool to evaluate patients with suspected neurological pathologY, even though it lacks the sensitivity and specificity needed to evaluate changes associated with venous sinus thrombosis (Buccino et al.
Thrombolytic agents, such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), streptokinase, and urokinase, may be used intravenously, though the precise dose that is delivered to the venous sinus is unknown and probably low (Baker et al.
Micro-balloons have also been used in venous sinus stenosis and may provide an additional tool in the treatment of CVST by assisting in sinus recanalization (Baker et al.
noted clinical improvement in cases where partial venous sinus recanalization was attained.
Identification of venous sinus thrombosis etiology is essential in defining additional treatment and identifying risk factors.
Thrombolytic therapy was the most effective for the immediate restoration of venous sinus patency, though 30% had hemorrhagic complications (Soleau et al.
Better prognoses were demonstrated in individuals who presented with headache and papilledema alone and who had rapid venous sinus recanalization or development of collaterals (Benamer & Bone, 2000).
Thrombosis of the venous sinus can cause headaches that can be intense and may require use of analgesics or narcotics.
Rheolytic catheter thrombolysis of dural venous sinus thrombosis: A case series.
Intracranial venous sinus thrombosis: Diagnosis suggested by computed tomography.