sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
18-21] Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis frequently co-occurs with peripheral venous vascular events such as deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary vascular disease; therefore, serum Hcy levels are expected to be high in vascular NBS.
Early imaging characteristics of 62 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.
Caption: Figure 3: MRV brain with contrast shows non opacification of the left transverse sinus due to underline deep venous sinus thrombosis
Long-term prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in childhood.
CT density measurement and H:H ratio are useful in diagnosing acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.
No differences were observed in the categories of ischemia/infarction (24% vs 21%) and venous sinus thrombosis (2% vs 0).
We present a case to show the benign outcome in a patient with IIH who was non-responsive to medical treatment, and who underwent balloon angioplasty recanalisationin the right transvers sinus and left sigmoid venous sinus.
Dural venous sinus thrombosis was found in three(6%) soldiers.
The finding of a shared dural venous sinus is of the highest significance because it increases the risk associated with surgical separation.
Treatment involves surgical exploration of the mastoid cavity, venous sinus decompression, and long-term antibiotic therapy.
Studies have previously described LS with thrombosis of the carotid artery, intracranial venous sinus and abdominopelvic vessels (1); only three have ever described involvement of the EJV.