verbose

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verbose

Wordy; long-winded. The term is often used as the name of a function that reports more information about an operation. For example, a /v parameter in a command might mean "verbose mode."
References in periodicals archive ?
He edited articulately and precisely, if perhaps verbosely, and it would do us well to consider what he had to say.
Bridges among water, with its array of spreading contours, continues the geographical-topographical theme, and the verbosely titled We live in the third world from the sun.
"[S]peak[ing] verbosely of its own silence, tak[ing] great pains to relate in detail the things it does not say" (Foucault 8), McCullers's texts enact a "veritable discursive explosion" (17) in--and by means of--the grotesque, which signals the violence of construing "the homosexual as the abject" (Fuss 3).
The account of the artist's career is verbosely inarticulate: an over-colloquial and remorseless spate of banality.
The above quotes from two very wise women should be heeded when planning merchandising or signage relating to desserts, but perhaps the 19th century French gastronome, Jean Antheleme Brillat-Savarin, put it best, albeit a bit verbosely, when he wrote, "If any man has drunk a little too deeply from the cup of physical pleasure; if he has spent too much time at his desk that should have been spent asleep; if his fine spirits have become temporarily dulled; if he finds the air too damp, the minutes too slow, and the atmosphere too heavy to withstand; if he is obsessed by a fixed idea which bars him from any freedom of thought; if he is any of these poor creatures, we say, let him be given a good pint of amber-flavored chocolate .
never?) as a single Peak Community of Southeast Asian Nations or, less verbosely, a Southeast Asian Union--equipped with one citizenship, one currency, and one government making one policy atop one big and fully regional (post-national) alp.
Two criticisms that could be levelled at this article are: (i) the tables showing that the commonest words in texts, even in the medical genre, are grammatical items (199, 200) might have been reduced to just a few examples in order to make the point less verbosely; (ii) the more appropriate lists of lexical collocations with the English noun disorder (203-4) are rather spoilt by several typographical errors, a fault which, unfortunately, mars other parts of the article, too.
Johnston is a good judge and reads races well, if a little verbosely at times, while it was hardly the greatest shock in the world that betting exchange expert Houghton's contribution became meaningful when he actually secured an internet connection, while Alex Steedman is an excellent commentator who strikes the right balance between telling us too much and too little.