verification

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verification

[‚ver·ə·fə′kā·shən]
(computer science)
The process of checking the results of one data transcription against the results of another data transcription; both transcriptions usually involve manual operations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

verification

any procedure regarded as establishing the TRUTH of a proposition or hypothesis.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Verification

 

an empirical confirmation of a theoretical scientific proposition, by a “return” to the visual level of cognition, whereby the ideal level of abstractions is ignored and the abstractions are identified with observable objects. For example, ideal geometrical objects such as points and straight lines are identified with their sensible forms. Generally, verification is the construction of a visual model for any given theory.

The idea of verification developed gradually as the role of logical deduction in the elaboration of scientific notions grew stronger. The recognition, particularly in mathematics and theoretical physics, of the possibility of a discrepancy between logical (abstract) thought and intuitive thought related to observability (for example, the discovery of continuous functions that have no derivative functions) gave rise to the need to substantiate the relation between abstraction and reality. A well-known expression of this need and at the same time of the position of empirical philosophy was the demand already made by Kant for the “observable exclusion” of any abstraction: “It is imperative to make any abstract conception sensory (Sinnlich), that is, to show the object corresponding to it in contemplation, since without this a conception (as it is said) would have no sense (ohne Sinn), that is to say, it would be devoid of meaning” (Works, vol. 3, Moscow, 1964, p. 302). In the neopositivist philosophy, this demand has acquired the status of a methodological principle—the principle of verifiability through experience, or the verification principle. To a certain extent it is analogous to the demand for the practical applicability of abstractions, through the removal of abstractions and their replacement by the “concrete” objects from which they are (can be) abstracted. However, as not every applicable abstraction can be verified, that is, excluded by the “visual” method (for not every reality expressed by an abstraction is observable), the criterion of verification is not identical with the criterion of practice.

REFERENCES

Wittgenstein, L. Logiko-filosofskii traktat. Moscow, 1958. (Translated from German.)
Narskii, I. S. Sovremennyi pozitivism: Kriticheski ocherk. Moscow, 1961.
Ianovskaia, S. A. “Problemy v vedeniia i iskliucheniia abstraktsii bolee vysokikh (chem pervyi) poriadkov.” In The Foundation of Statements and Decisions: Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Methodology of Sciences, Held in Warsaw 18-23 September, 1961. Warsaw, 1965.
Nevanlinna, R. Prostranstvo vremia i otnositel’nost’. Moscow, 1966. (Translated from German.)
Schlick, M. “Meaning and Verification.” Philosophical Review, 1936, vol. 45, no. 4.
Carnap, R. “Testability and Meaning.” Philosophy of Science, 1936, vol. 3, no. 4; vol. 4, no. 1.

M. M. NOVOSELOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

verification

The process of determining whether or not the products of a given phase in the life-cycle fulfil a set of established requirements.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

verification key

The verification key is the public key used in a digital signature. Contrast with signing key. See digital signature and public key cryptography.

verify

(1) To prove the correctness of data. See validate.

(2) In software quality assurance, to determine that a system conforms to the intended behavior specified in design documents. Contrast with validate.

(3) In data entry operations, to compare the keystrokes of a second operator with the data entered by the first operator to ensure that the data were entered accurately. See validate.

(4) An internal DOS/Windows command that tests each write operation by reading it back.
verify on     turn on
    verify off    turn off
    verify        display status
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
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