vernacular

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vernacular

1. a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built
2. designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
3. built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Vernacular

In architecture, vernacular buildings reflect the traditional architecture of the region originally developed in response to the climate, land conditions, social and cultural preferences, scenery, and locally available resources and materials. The forms are native or peculiar to a particular country or locality. It represents a form of building that is based on regional forms and materials, primarily concerned with ordinary domestic and functional buildings, rather than commercial structures.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of the way Stainton and Elugardo understand vernacularism, Stainton's claim that no proposition derives its logical form from any speech act plays a central role in his argument against it.
In consequence, if it can be shown that (A) and (B) hold for sub-sentential speech acts, the question whether the proposition conveyed in a sub-sentential speech act gets its logical form from the speech act itself would remain open, and vernacularism might yet be salvaged.
Contemporary vernacularism also helped to shift the very bases of the English religion.
The Prayerbook's vernacularism is thus fundamentally linked to the Reformation's theological insistence on the participation and comprehension of individual subjects.
While word lists and dictionaries with Scotticisms were produced to prevent their readers from the use of such uncouth vernacularisms in the eighteenth century, the production of today's dictionaries is supported by the opposite motivation: rather than eliminate a variety, their aim is to preserve it.
The ideas expressed, the images evoked, the eccentricities in syntax, the liberal sprinkling of vernacularisms: all these impart a distinctively local colour and flavour to the language that clothes their thoughts.