vernacular

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vernacular

1. a local style of architecture, in which ordinary houses are built
2. designating or relating to the common name of an animal or plant
3. built in the local style of ordinary houses, rather than a grand architectural style

Vernacular

In architecture, vernacular buildings reflect the traditional architecture of the region originally developed in response to the climate, land conditions, social and cultural preferences, scenery, and locally available resources and materials. The forms are native or peculiar to a particular country or locality. It represents a form of building that is based on regional forms and materials, primarily concerned with ordinary domestic and functional buildings, rather than commercial structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
I term these postvernacular translations, examples of a much larger mode of engagement with Yiddish that is distinct from vernacularity, and which has become increasingly prominent in the post-Holocaust era.
This dialectical vernacular locates vernacularity (3) in a process that "imagines a web of intentions moving along vectors of structural power that emerge as vernacular whenever they assert their alterity from the institutional" (p.
However, they demonstrate the way in which, even through benevolent intention, the orchestrated performance of vernacularity might do more to reinforce the othered status of oppressed groups, rather than empower their participation in public conversation.
Just as important is the simple fact of its vernacularity. As Nicholas Watson and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne have argued, romanz would become the preeminent language of devotional reading in late medieval England.
(21) Ralph Hanna, III, 'Miscellaneity and Vernacularity: Conditions of Literary Production in Late Medieval England', in The Whole Book: Cultural Perspectives on the Medieval Miscellany, eds Stephen G.
"'Moult bien parloit et lisoit le franchois' or Did Richard II Read with a Picard Accent?" In The Vulgar Tongue: Medieval and Postmedieval Vernacularity, ed.
Eyol Poleg likewise challenges the simple equation of vernacularity with dissent: he uses evidence from the layout, composition, and annotation of Wycliffite Bibles to argue that many of their owners were using them as aids to engage with the orthodox Latin liturgy.
Thus the English does not represent some extractable piece of vernacularity; rather, it provides but a single element within a bilingual mixture of a generally quite unexpected sort--what Rossell Hope Robbins describes as "popular song" in collision with serious Latin learning.
Salter, Elisabeth and Helen Wicker, eds, Vernacularity in England and Wales, c.
(1) An earlier version of this research was delivered at the 'Useful Knowledges and Vernacularity: Manuscripts, Readers and Information in Late Medieval England' Symposium, Knowledge Networks and Communities of Reading (KNOW) research cluster in the Australian Research Council Network for Early European Research, The University of Tasmania, November 2007.
Matthews argues that the more recent extension of critical interest to the literature of the fifteenth century needs to be matched by paying greater attention to English literary output in the century or so before the activities of Chaucer, Gower, Langland, and the Gawain poet (and before, to use the author's own phrase, the 'Ricardian explosion of vernacularity', p.