vernicle


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vernicle

Veronica’s veil with Jesus’s facial image. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 107]
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In addition, the final section consists of a critical edition of the Middle English poem 'O Vernicle' edited by Ann Eljenhom Nichols, highlighting too the importance of the theme to literary scholars.
The poetic section breaks up Christ's face into different objects visualized on the vernicle: "His moth, his nose, his ine to, /His berd, his here did al so" (his mouth, his nose, his two eyes, /his beard, his ear did also).
81r) (Have six thousand seven hundred five and fifty year/and half a year and days three)." (134) Within the Arma Christi, there is a separate indulgence, the second, just for gazing at the vernicle: "And ich bischop sayd to-for-hand/For syzt of pe vernacul hath graunt/xl dayus to pardon" (And I, the bishop who said earlier/ for the sight of the vernacle shall grant/ 40 days to pardon).
Drawing of the Holy Face on the Vernicle, ?compiler (see Figure 1).
Thus, Catherine's use of the "Protestant" drums in Vernicle functions for her as an affirmation of life in general rather than a celebration of one particular kind of life.
All these moments are then positively reclaimed and formalized in the final appearance of the bells (274) as part of the second movement of Vernicle, the orchestral composition that closes the novel.
But since nomen est omen, the popularity of Veronica and her vernicle was certainly increased by the false etymology.
British Library, Additional MS 22029 is a fifteenth-century parchment roll five inches in width and over four feet in length that contains just one text, a witness of the Symbols of the Passion, a lyric also known by its incipit "O Vernicle" (IMEV 2577, Figure 1).
Ann Eljenholm Nichols is currently preparing a new edition of the "O Vernicle" lyric (IMEV 2577) to be included in the forthcoming volume: Arma Christi: Objects, Representation, and Devotional Practice in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, ed.
On folio 7, at the opening of DIMEV 2577 (the Arma Christi) is a one-third page illustration of the Vernicle cloth.
(18) Cador is not the only one to give thanks to God or Christ for the Roman hostilities; several other kings and knights--including Aungers (296), Beryn of Brittany (308), the King of Wales (320), Launcelot (369), and King Lot (386)--invoke the name of God and/or swear oaths by Christ and the holy vernicle that they will defeat the Romans in battle.
Instead of the morbid Catholic cult of vernicles and sudaria, he gives us a cloth of different sacramental nature, the domestic sacrament of collaborative sewing: 'A glance at the old work of our common girlhood would awaken good thoughts of by-gone days, and soften our hearts to affection and love' (p.