vertical axis


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vertical axis

[′vərd·ə·kəl ′ak·səs]
(naval architecture)
The vertical line near the center of gravity of a craft, perpendicular to both the longitudinal and lateral axes, around which it yaws.

normal axis

normal axis
A straight line through the center of gravity, which is vertical when the airplane is in the rigging position. The aircraft yaws about this axis. Also called a vertical axis.
References in periodicals archive ?
This configuration consist of a cooling tower which represent the unnatural wind resource, and two vertical axis wind turbines installed in cross-air orientation at the exit of cooling tower, as shown in Fig(1).
Modeling and diagnostics of vertical axis rotary system driven by multi gear drive, Journal of Vibroengineering 14(1): 171-177.
In this paper work the flow field around new concept of Darrieus-type (lift- based) vertical axis wind turbine has been predicted numerically using CFD method, namely URANS.
The performance of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor in terms of rpm was tested at various speeds of wind source by changing direction of the wind beam striking from centre of the rotor to the tip of the rotor active side without introducing blockage in the downstream flow (free stream wind).
If the airplane is in straight-and-level cruising flight and a sideward gust impacts it, the tendency is to create a yawing motion about the vertical axis, into the relative wind, also known as a "skid." This tendency is dampened by increased aerodynamic pressure on the vertical stabilizer from the gust, which resists the yaw.
By default, the setting is "Automatic for Each Sparkline" for both the Vertical Axis Minimum Value Option and the Vertical Axis Maximum Value Option.
Sheppard Holdings, LLC will hold the exclusive worldwide rights to distribute and sell an innovative Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) systems developed by Torsion Tec, a British Columbia company.
The Iowa Department of Economia Development has awarded $150,000 to a local company to manufacture and commercialize vertical axis wind turbines.
Of course, it could be that the female figure is the practitioner, in which case it is not customary for the patient to hold the device, particularly as the practitioner would need to rock the device along its vertical axis to provide the required information.
'Windspire operates with three sets of tall, narrow airfoils that catch the wind, while spinning around a vertical axis,' says AllSafe Director, Mark Hawley.