vertical stretching

vertical stretching

[′vərd·ə·kəl ′strech·iŋ]
(meteorology)
A process in which ascending vertical motion of air increases with altitude, or descending motion decreases with (increasing) altitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abd El-Aziz, "Unsteady mixed convection heat transfer along a vertical stretching surface with variable viscosity and viscous dissipation," Journal of the Egyptian Mathematical Society, vol.
Asghar, "Effects of radiation and magnetic field on the mixed convection stagnation-point flow over a vertical stretching sheet in a porous medium," International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol.
Sibanda, "Effects of chemical reaction on boundary layer flow past a vertical stretching surface in the presence of internal heat generation," International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat and Fluid Flow, vol.
Layek, "Slip effect on diffusion of chemically reactive species in boundary layer flow over a vertical stretching sheet with suction or blowing," Chemical Engineering Communications, vol.
Kandasamy, P Loganathan, and P Puvi Arasu, "Scaling group transformation for MHD boundary-layer flow of a nanofluid past a vertical stretching surface in the presence of suction/injection," Nuclear Engineering and Design, vol.
[6], studied magneto hydrodynamics (MHD) heat transfer mixed convection flow along a vertical stretching sheet in the presence of magnetic field with heat generation.
MHD heat transfer mixed convection flow along a vertical stretching sheet in presence of magnetic field with heat generation, Int.
[10] Kandasamy, R., Periasamy, K, Sivagnana K.K, Prabhu, Chemical reaction, heat and mass transfer on MHD flow over a vertical stretching surface with heat source and thermal satisfaction effects, Int.
* Standing with arms alongside the body, rising the arms by the side and crossing them over the head, lifting on the tips and maximum vertical stretching, inspiration; returning with stretched arms through sideways in a relaxed position, with expiration.
The authors' simulations show that strong, sustained vertical updrafts are positioned near and above the low-level circulation centers, providing strong dynamic lifting and vertical stretching to the air at the lower levels, which favors the creation of tornadoes.
[21] presented numerical solutions to the unsteady convective boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid at a vertical stretching surface with variable transport properties and thermal radiation.
The MHD effect on a vertical stretching surface with suction and blowing was studied by Gorla et al.