vertical visibility


Also found in: Acronyms.

vertical visibility

[′vərd·ə·kəl ‚vis·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(meteorology)
According to United States weather observing practice, the distance that an observer can see vertically into a surface-based obscuring phenomenon, such as fog, rain, or snow.

vertical visibility

The maximum height from which a pilot can recognize ground features when the surface is obscured because of a meteorological phenomenon. The distance one can see upward in similar conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
REPORTABLE SKY COVER DEFINITIONS Abbreviation Meaning Coverage W Vertical Visibility 8/8 SKC or CLR Clear 0 FEW Few 1/8-2/8 SCT Scattered 3/8-4/8 BKN Broken 5/8-7/8 OVC Overcast 8/8
Five hundred feet of vertical visibility only translates to 500 feet of horizontal visibility, A tight, low-altitude 360 in rotten visibility is a preamble to an accident report.
This is a gradual purchase (supply) of special meteorological instruments for automated measurement of temperature, humidity and atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, cloud base height measurement, vertical visibility, clouds cover the sky, ground and weather conditions, visibility on automated weather stations ( AMS) Czech Hydrometeorological Institute.
Weather in the area was widely report to include 1/4 mile visibility; fog; sky obscured; vertical visibility 100 feet.
Vertical visibility (VV) is the distance a person can see vertically into an obscuring phenomena.
At 0742, PAO's weather observation included variable wind at five knots, one-eighth of a mile visibility with fog and a vertical visibility of 100 feet.
At 0153, an automated weather observation included % miles visibility with mist and 200 feet vertical visibility.
That's one of the reasons the "ceiling obscured" terminology describing a low, indefinite ceiling on the old sequence reports was replaced with vertical visibility in the newer Metar format.