vertical visibility


Also found in: Acronyms.

vertical visibility

[′vərd·ə·kəl ‚vis·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(meteorology)
According to United States weather observing practice, the distance that an observer can see vertically into a surface-based obscuring phenomenon, such as fog, rain, or snow.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

vertical visibility

The maximum height from which a pilot can recognize ground features when the surface is obscured because of a meteorological phenomenon. The distance one can see upward in similar conditions.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
REPORTABLE SKY COVER DEFINITIONS Abbreviation Meaning Coverage W Vertical Visibility 8/8 SKC or CLR Clear 0 FEW Few 1/8-2/8 SCT Scattered 3/8-4/8 BKN Broken 5/8-7/8 OVC Overcast 8/8
Five hundred feet of vertical visibility only translates to 500 feet of horizontal visibility, A tight, low-altitude 360 in rotten visibility is a preamble to an accident report.
Weather in the area was widely report to include 1/4 mile visibility; fog; sky obscured; vertical visibility 100 feet.
Vertical visibility (VV) is the distance a person can see vertically into an obscuring phenomena.
At 0742, PAO's weather observation included variable wind at five knots, one-eighth of a mile visibility with fog and a vertical visibility of 100 feet.
At 0153, an automated weather observation included % miles visibility with mist and 200 feet vertical visibility.
That's one of the reasons the "ceiling obscured" terminology describing a low, indefinite ceiling on the old sequence reports was replaced with vertical visibility in the newer Metar format.