vesicant


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vesicant

[′ves·ə·kənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent that causes blistering.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We had a nurse who discussed the standard of care, including that you should flush before and after administration of any vesicant, and at least every two hours," he said.
Mitomycin is a potent vesicant that can cause tissue blistering and necrosis.
Up to 41 distinct chemical species in 5 different categories (ie, sternutating [respiratory irritant], lacrimatory [tearing], pulmonary [choking], vesicant [blister], and systemic [blood] agents) were used on battlefields between 1914 and 1918, although most of the damage was limited to chlorine, phosgene, and sulfur mustard.
Vesicant extravasation part II: evidence-based management and continuing controversies.
speciosa are emollient, vesicant, stimulant, and rubefacient and are traditionally used in the treatment of various skin diseases [6, 7].
In addition, because the WC ratio is too large, the coagulation time is longer than the vesicant's foaming time; in the later foaming stage, parts of the pores merge, which decreases the evenness and significantly decreases the strength of the pore structure in the sample.
Sulfur is a vital ingredient in the manufacture of mustard gas, which has powerful vesicant effects and can cause chemical burns on exposed individuals.
PERIPHERALLY Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) are inserted in patients who require long term treatment with irritant and vesicant drugs, medication with extremes of pH and osmolarity, cytotoxic drugs or parenteral nutrition and those with poor or limited venous access requiring treatment.
The roots of the young tree and also root bark are rubefacient and vesicant. The seeds from this plant contain active coagulating agents characterized as dimeric cationic proteins, having molecular weight of 13 kDa and an isoelectric point between 10 and 11.
Chemical munitions known to have been disposed of at sea included munitions filled with sulfur mustard, a vesicant (i.e., an agent that causes chemical burns or blisters of the skin and mucous membranes) (2).
The shoots and young leaves contain a rubefacient and vesicant principle (Chopra & Badhwar 1940, Behl et al.