Vespertine


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

vespertine

[′ves·pər‚tīn]
(vertebrate zoology)
Active in the evening.

Vespertine

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Vespertine (from the Latin vesper, meaning “evening”) refers to the evening, especially the early evening, and in astrology was traditionally applied to a planet or star that dropped below the horizon soon after sunset. Vespertine is the opposite of matutine (which refers to planets and stars that rise above the horizon just before sunrise). Both terms are rarely used in modern astrology.

References in periodicals archive ?
After Vespertine I was going to do an album with intuition only, no brain please.
Vespertine by Bj|rk, Becoming a Jackal by Villagers and Dilate by Ani DIfranco Tell us about a great band we might not have heard of...
Odor was characterized as slightly sweet, being predominantly released in the vespertine twilight, which is very similar to previously described to other species of Brassavola by Roebuck and Steinhart (1978).
There are also slightly mystical animals, Blood Red Zebra, the animal painted on a red background, and Vespertine, a big cat with psychedelic eyes.
El CD 1 nos ofrece nuevas versiones de algunos de los temas de Volta y, como es ya una practica habitual en Bjork, recreaciones radicales de temas de registros anteriores, en este caso de Post (1995), Homogenic (1997), Vespertine (2001) y Medhlla (2004).
angulatus (Linnaeus 1758), a vespertine species occurring in fishponds, watercourses, and rivers of South America (Peters and Orejas-Miranda 1970, Dixon and Soini 1986, Martins and Oliveira 1998, Ford and Ford 2002, Marques et.
Vespertine posterior diplostemonous oik teleroentgenogram.
The medieval scholiast Pseudo-Bede (twelfth century C.E.) even commented on the occasional joint appearance of Venus and Mercury in the matutinal and vespertine skies: These two planets are also sometimes both above the Sun or below it, or both before or after it.
The hesperian and somewhat vespertine "utmost bound of human thought" was originally, and much more literally, the "ultima Thule" of geography, not philosophy; it is not found so much in Dante, as in the prediction of the chorus in Seneca's Medea, 375-379:
"Pagan Poetry," from Vespertine (2001), builds slowly, with Bjork wailing over swelling keyboard crescendos--"The darkest pit in me/It's pagan poetry....
More often than not she proves them right, stretching and beating the genre to a formless gee, creating head-scratch-inducing songs like the Oscar-nominated "I've Seen It All" or overseeing remixes of her own album tracks that end up taking the aural shape of a crashing metallic robot war, only to turn around and create an entire album of hushed, delicate tunes on her last release, Vespertine. Of course, all these choices only further cement her standing for her fans.
There are renegades from a medieval world--"vespertine figures, rotund and druidical"--and figures who suggest still earlier periods when "troglodytes gathered in some firelit cave" (120, 150).