Vespidae

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Vespidae

[′ves·pə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A widely distributed family of Hymenoptera in the superfamily Vespoidea including hornets, yellow jackets, and potter wasps.

Vespidae

 

(true wasps), a family of hymenopterous insects. The fore wings fold along the back when the insect is at rest. The abdomen often has alternating black and yellow stripes. The Vespidae include both solitary and social species. The females of solitary species feed their larvae with paralyzed insects (Eumeniinae, Euparagiinae, and Zethinae) or pollen (Masarinae). Social wasps have fertile females and barren females known as workers. They build complex nests of paper (Polybiinae, Polistinae, and Vespinae).

References in periodicals archive ?
They studied the attractiveness of vespid wasp to volatile materials produced from green-lipped mussel and compared with different kinds of meat.
The striking mid-season increase in vespid abundance (Fig.
5 m) of 12 trees in a temperate deciduous forest yielded 522 vespid wasps.
LIFE HISTORY INFORMATION AND MEAN [+ OR -] SE (N = 12) ABUNDANCE OF VESPID SPECIES CAPTURED IN FLIGHT INTERCEPT TRAPS SUSPENDED IN THE CROWNS ([greater than or equal to] 15 M) OR NEAR THE BASES (0.
including dipterans, as well as hymenopterans such as vespids, braconids and chalcids, but not bees (reviewed in Bino et al.
Charts from a total of 122 patients seen between 1995 and 2000 in EDs in California's Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys were reviewed retrospectively Bee stings caused 70% of the reactions, and vespids (wasps and/or hornets) 30%.
Polistes is a large, cosmopolitan genus of eusocial wasps, and like other social vespids, its members can create environmental problems when introduced to novel environments.
The females of a few solitary vespids may oviposit after they have stored the larval food and some are progressive provisioning during the early larval period (eg, see Cowan 1991).
dyscherus, most mud-daubing vespids obtain their mortar for nest construction by drinking water at one place and then flying to a site of dry, clayey soil where they bite at the ground, regurgitate water, and mix the resulting mud to the proper consistency (Iwata 1938, 1939).