vestigial


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vestigial

[və′stij·ē·əl]
(biology)
Of, being, or resembling a vestige.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Vestigial Nematic State had been predicted by theorists but there was no experimental evidence.
In my opinion, the 'peacekeeping' thing is vestigial. Much like the bayonet.
"The forelegs are extremely enlarged, whereas mid- and hind legs are reduced to small, possibly vestigial remnants," according to the study.
Basal half of movable chelal finger with 5 or more rounded, partially fused, vestigial teeth, without canals, on raised lamina 5 Basal half of movable chelal finger with only 1 rounded, vestigial teeth, without canal, on weak lamina O.
There were also some 308 carbines converted and 300 rifles were made using Model 1874 actions, which do not have the vestigial pellet priming setup of the earlier gun.
We commend the state for currently taking a close look at the goliath situation, as well as reviewing the status of other popular species such as spotted seatrout which still lingers along with a vestigial commercial season.
It also has to come clean on its relations with Iran and Qatar: Any lingering or vestigial links to Tehran or Doha will attract scorn and anger from the Gulf Cooperation Council.
The vermouth quotient, once so important to the drink, had been reduced so dramatically that it was practically a vestigial organ - the martini's appendix, if you will.
Previously, we reported investigations into such trends in the topics of vestigial structures (as mainstream scientists understand them), biological degeneration (as CS practitioners understand it), (6) and beneficial mutations.
Nuclear war -- or some other event leaving behind the scars of radioactivity -- has left traces of dystopia everywhere, from their dog, who bears a vestigial third set of paws, to the Geiger counter that indicates whether the mutated animals in the area are safe for consumption.
In England during the 16th and 17th centuries, he contends, Petrarchan subjectivities were articulated in the vernacular poetic medium that, to a tangible degree, retained traces of medieval structures of discourse and selfhood, and vestigial fragments of medieval poetic imagination can be uncovered in the poetry of English Petrarchans from Thomas Wyatt to Shakespeare.
The result is an included vestigial remnant of a diamniotic monochorionic twin that is located within the body of the otherwise normally developed twin.