vestry

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vestry

1. a room in or attached to a church in which vestments, sacred vessels, etc., are kept
2. a room in or attached to some churches, used for Sunday school, meetings, etc.
3. Church of England
a. a meeting of all the members of a parish or their representatives, to transact the official business of the parish
b. the body of members meeting for this; the parish council
4. Episcopalian (US) and Anglican (Canadian) Churches a committee of vestrymen chosen by the congregation to manage the temporal affairs of their church

Vestry

Attached building to a church, where the vestments and sacred vessels are kept; also called a sacristy.

Vestry

 

in Christian churches, a place where vestments worn by priests during services and church utensils are kept. Vestries are usually located within the church, for example, in one of the sanctuaries, but may also be in the form of an annex or, in monasteries, a separate building.

vestry, revestry

A chamber in a church, near the sanctuary, for the storage of the utensils used in a service and for the robes of the clergy and choir.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, by defining synagogue legislative meetings as vestries, these same landed elites would have the ability to choose who sat in the House of Assembly and to take part in the assembly themselves.
Vestries were "the main organ of local government" in England and her colonies.
While the Gin Acts of 1736, 1737, and 1738 all provided the vestries with a new source of funds, they also threatened to add to the poor rates by depriving widows and other marginal members of the community of a livelihood.
By 1751, the urban vestries were again active participants in the campaign to limit sales of distilled spirits, with the vestrymen of the Westminster parishes of Sr.
Though the Progressives controlled just under a quarter of the vestries and district boards during the 1890s, their attitude to the lower tier of London government can only be described as malevolent.
A realistic balance sheet of the achievements and failures of the pre-1899 vestries and district boards (as of the metropolitan boroughs that replaced them) would require a lifetime's research.
In 1897 the Vestries of both Westminster and Kensington petitioned the Crown to be given borough charters: the Vestry of Hammersmith obtained a grant of arms from the College of Heralds; a couple, of other vestries adopted heraldic badges unofficially; and a group representing some of the inhabitants of Southwark, going to the other extreme, brought in a parliamentary bill aimed at incorporating Southwark into the City of London.
The vestries have been created as part of the Cathedral's Open Treasure project, which involves significant works in the buildings, which was first built to meet the needs of the monks who lived there before the reformation.
Harcourt would have abolished the Metropolitan Board of Works and the Vestries and retained a democratized Lord Mayor's office.
The Government of Victorian London, 1855-1889: The Metropolitan Board of Works, the Vestries, and the City Corporation (Cambridge, Mass.
Another political avenue was the mobilisation of all the Vestries and Boards of Works in London to lobby the M.