vestry


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

vestry

1. a room in or attached to a church in which vestments, sacred vessels, etc., are kept
2. a room in or attached to some churches, used for Sunday school, meetings, etc.
3. Church of England
a. a meeting of all the members of a parish or their representatives, to transact the official business of the parish
b. the body of members meeting for this; the parish council
4. Episcopalian (US) and Anglican (Canadian) Churches a committee of vestrymen chosen by the congregation to manage the temporal affairs of their church

Vestry

Attached building to a church, where the vestments and sacred vessels are kept; also called a sacristy.

Vestry

 

in Christian churches, a place where vestments worn by priests during services and church utensils are kept. Vestries are usually located within the church, for example, in one of the sanctuaries, but may also be in the form of an annex or, in monasteries, a separate building.

vestry, revestry

A chamber in a church, near the sanctuary, for the storage of the utensils used in a service and for the robes of the clergy and choir.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as the vestry debates sparked questions about the proper role of women, so, too, they led to questions about appropriate male 'behavior.
Vestry board members genuinely were surprised to learn, Whispers is told, that such a scenario could play out, COBRA, you see, doesn't apply in the event that a business, such as Cathedral, well, goes out of business.
It was also very interesting to see who chaperoned the Queen at Cheltenham races, none other than Lord Sam Vestry of the Vestry-Dewhurst and meat importer family business.
In addition to vestry work, a fresh coat of paint and a long list of other minor improvements, the revamp will contribute towards changes needed to meet new regulations on emissions which come into force in 2012.
JUBILANT community workers are celebrating after landing grants for their chapel vestry.
They will catalogue hundreds of letters, memos and reports held within the long-forgotten records of Liverpool Vestry.
Having written a history of the neighborhood, Mhurchadha here presents texts and commentary of the vestry book for the four rural united parishes in north County Dublin during the second half of the 17th century and first half of the 18th.
He then returned to the abbey, which was built in 1150 and was still in use as a parish church, and started a fire in the vestry.
he served on vestry, and was the people's warden for a number of terms.
Yes, I often come to Braehead and I've bought a few things from Vestry.
James Piccadilly, for example, the vestry ordered "That every Bedel in his respective Ward .