Vice Admiral

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Vice Admiral

 

a naval military rank that corresponds to the rank of lieutenant general in the army. This rank was introduced in Russia by Peter I in 1699 and in the USSR in 1940.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
prosecutors and informers to bypass juries by using the vice-admiralty
representation and about the use of the vice-admiralty courts for
Snell also writes that the vice-admiralty courts retained in rem jurisdiction over the pirate spoils.); TRYALS OF THIRTY-SIX PERSONS FOR PIRACY (Samuel Kneeland 1723) (describing a trial in a court of vice-admiralty in Rhode Island).
(121.) CARL UBBELOHDE, THE VICE-ADMIRALTY COURTS AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 17 n.18 (1960).
Thus, an early version of the oath of office for judges included an affirmation that the judge "will take no fee, gift or reward." (57) A one percent share of any prize awarded was set aside for deposit in the Treasury to help defray the cost of the court, but (in contrast with the colonial vice-admiralty court) none of this money went to the judges directly.
(63) They had also criticized payment systems that relied on fees from litigants, particularly when those fees were payable (as they were in the vice-admiralty courts) on terms that gave the judge a financial interest in the outcome.
Entries from Indian's log books, Admiralty documents, vice-admiralty court records and the Royal Nova Scotia Gazette prove that Charles Austen was involved in the taking of various types and sizes of vessels: he accounted for five ships, four schooners, three brigs, and one French privateer.
There would be no pay out to the captain and men unless first, the vice-admiralty court ruled that the captured vessel and/or its cargo were "good and lawful prize" and secondly, a higher court did not subsequently overturn such judgements.
The decision in 1891 to select the Exchequer Court as Canada's admiralty court was the culmination of a long-held belief that the time had come to replace the British vice-admiralty courts in Canada with a domestic tribunal or tribunals.
During the 1860s, Henry Black, the Judge of Vice-Admiralty in Lower Canada, put forward a suggestion that admiralty jurisdiction would be exercised on the Great Lakes where it had not been exercised by any British vice-admiralty court.
Harrington, The Legacy of the Colonial Vice-Admiralty Courts (Part I), 26 J.
The youngest son of New York's vice-admiralty court judge and proprietor of Morrisania, whose half brother became a brigadier general in the British Army, and whose grandfather had been royal governor of New Jersey, would seem an improbable revolutionary.