viceroy

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viceroy

a governor of a colony, country, or province who acts for and rules in the name of his sovereign or government
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Don Bernardino Valdes, of the council of the Indies, was given supervision over this matter in his commission as 'juez particular y privativo' for the collection of all sums due to the real hacienda in the viceroyalties of Peru and New Spain.
The examples dealt with in this study show that the ceremonies established at the end of the 16th century to acclaim the Hispanic monarchs at the royal court were transferred to the other capital cities of the kingdoms and viceroyalties of the composite Hispanic monarchy.
A PAN-NATIONAL EXHIBITION of some 250 works of art created in the Spanish viceroyalties of New Spain (which today comprises Mexico and the countries of Central America) and Peru (now the nations of Ecuador, Uruguay, Paraguay, Venezuela, Colombia, Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru), and in the Portuguese colony of Brazil has been drawn from public and private collections throughout the Americas and in Europe.
Instead, the territorial history of independence is the history of the break-up of colonial viceroyalties into regional fragments, the consequence of caudillo-led internal war.
From New Spain (the Spanish viceroyalty that included much of the southern tier of the present United States, Mexico and Central America) and the viceroyalties of Peru and Brazil, over 250 objects have been gathered, dating from the beginning of the conquest in 1521 to the independence movements brought on by Napoleon's invasion of Spain in 1808.
To organize these areas and administer their potential profits, the Spanish Kingdom developed two viceroyalties: the first, created in 1535 and called Nueva Espana, covered all Spanish colonies north of the Panama isthmus; the second, established in 1544 under the name El Peru, included territories under Spanish control south of Panama.
Though technically part of the imperial system and on the same administrative levels as other viceroyalties, the viceroyalty of New Spain, like that of Peru, was recognized as a colonial dependency.