videocassette recorder


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

videocassette recorder

(VCR), device that can record television programs or the images from a video camera on magnetic tape (see tape recordertape recorder,
device for recording and replaying of sound, video, and digital information on plastic (usually polyester) or paper tape. The tape is coated with fine particles of a magnetic substance, usually an oxide of iron, cobalt, or chromium.
..... Click the link for more information.
); it can also play prerecorded tapes. A VCR converts the separate audio and video portions of a television or video camera signal to magnetic flux variations to magnetize the tape. The video recording heads move in a direction almost perpendicular to the tape movement, resulting in tracks that run diagonally across the tape width and increasing tape capacity. A camcorder combines a video camera and VCR in a single handheld machine.

The first commercially successful VCR, which used a Betamax format, was introduced in 1975. A competitive format, VHS (Video Home System), was introduced in the same year and became the dominant system. Although both systems use 0.5-in.- (13-mm-) wide tape, they are mutually incompatible; a tape recorded on one system cannot be played on the other. A third system using 0.3-in.-wide (8-mm) tape was introduced in 1984; it is used primarily in camcorders. In 1994 electronics companies agreed on international standards for a digital VCR. The introduction of the DVD (1996) and the recordable DVD (see digital versatile discdigital versatile disc
or digital video disc
(DVD), a small plastic disc used for the storage of digital data. The successor media to the compact disc (CD), a DVD can have more than 100 times the storage capacity of a CD.
..... Click the link for more information.
) led to a steady shift away from the VCR. By 2003 rentals of DVDs surpassed VHS tapes, and by 2016 manufacturers had stopped producing both Betamax and VHS machines.

videocassette recorder

[¦vid·ē·ō‚kə′set ri‚kȯrd·ər]
(electronics)
A device for video recording and playing of magnetic tapes that are contained in plastic cases. Abbreviated VCR.
References in periodicals archive ?
The introduction of videocassette recorders and video games boosted sales of televisions in the 1980's.
Today videocassette recorders can be bought for $50 and combination cassette and DVD machines for not much more.
The Vietnam War was history, stagflation had been vanquished, and technology that enabled everything from cleaner, more fuel-efficient cars to automated teller machines to videocassette recorders had vastly improved everyday life.
He's outfitted 120 classrooms with LCD projectors and videocassette recorders, and linked everything via the school's computer network.
Color television sets, videocassette recorders, personal computers (PCs), video game consoles and automobile polish newly lined up as relatively low-priced in Tokyo, while electric razors, 8-milimeter video tapes, Japan-made passenger cars, motorbikes and PC software were the same as last year.
Videocassette recorders belong to nearly 75 percent, and more than 20 percent own two VCRs.
that the use of videocassette recorders may be replacing attendance at live performances, that a majority of Americans support arts education for their children, and that women support the arts more than men do.
Back in the 1970s the Supreme Court ruled that Sony Corp could sell its videocassette recorders because they were "time- shifting" programs (recording them for later viewing), and therefore not infringing copyright.
You might even chuckle at the Monsieur Hulot-ish disorientation of Hurt's technologically clueless writer as he solves the mysteries of multiplex cinemas and videocassette recorders.
Products covered in the HFN Electronics Network statistical report are video game platforms, autosound, audio (compacts and rack systems only), total CD players (those included in systems as well as portable CDs), camcorders, color Tvs, videocassette recorders, refrigerators, automatic washers and electric cooking appliances.
They might not have the same appeal as videocassette recorders or microwave ovens, but personal seismographs could become a hot item in the San Francisco Bay area if a new proposal gains momentum.
Specialized videocassette recorders, video printers, and, more recently, digitally stored images now give security directors the opportunity to present hard evidence against criminals.