videodisc

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videodisc

or

videodisk,

disk used with a special player and television to reproduce both pictures and sound. A videodisc player cannot record television programs off the air for later playback, unlike a videocassette recordervideocassette recorder
(VCR), device that can record television programs or the images from a video camera on magnetic tape (see tape recorder); it can also play prerecorded tapes.
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 (VCR) or recordable DVD (see digital versatile discdigital versatile disc
or digital video disc
(DVD), a small plastic disc used for the storage of digital data. The successor media to the compact disc (CD), a DVD can have more than 100 times the storage capacity of a CD.
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). Videodiscs generally produce pictures that are clearer in detail and truer in color than those produced by VCR tapes, and they also offer better sound quality, but the introduction of the DVD led to their becoming obsolete. Two quite different videodisc systems were developed. One operates much like a record playerrecord player
or phonograph,
device for reproducing sound that has been recorded as a spiral, undulating groove on a disk. This disk is known as a phonograph record, or simply a record (see sound recording).
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, using a mechanical stylus that senses varying patterns of electrical capacitance imprinted in grooves on the disc surface. That format fell into disuse, becoming superseded by the laser disc system, which uses a laserlaser
[acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation], device for the creation, amplification, and transmission of a narrow, intense beam of coherent light. The laser is sometimes referred to as an optical maser.
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 to read a track cut in a spiral pattern on the inside surface of the disc. On a laser disc, video is recorded as an analog signal and the soundtrack is either an analog or, in later versions, a digital signal.

videodisc

(1) An early optical disc used for full-motion video. See LaserDisc, CED and Video CD.

(2) An optical disc that contains video material. Today's video formats are DVD and Blu-Ray. See DVD and Blu-ray.
References in periodicals archive ?
The program includes 11 videodiscs, each with hundreds of photographs, diagrams, movie clips, and animations.
The difference between videodisc and CD is in the way they store information.
Because the story is on videodisc, there is easy access to scenes that contain information relevant to the problem (access can be controlled via a computer interface, a barcode reader, or a hand-held remote control).
Although videodiscs are somewhat clumsier to use than CD-ROMs, the technology is still extremely useful for providing customized video presentations.
Videodiscs also have two audio tracks, so an instructor using the ASCD videodisc can either play the dialogue used by the demonstration teacher or the second track, which contains a commentary or explanation of the technique being demonstrated.
Videodiscs. Videodiscs use a technology similar to that of compact discs.
First they developed detailed teaching plans for the videodiscs. Then they followed up with money and a timetable for faculty training.
Sixty-five percent of the campuses in Texas chose some percentage of their textbook allotment in videodiscs. Schools began using the electronic instructional systems in September 1991.
There are several configurations that are possible, and each of these will affect how you use videodiscs technologies in your art program: Look, Look and Control, Integrate and Interact.
Videodiscs, then, are not the hidden remedy to a flagging computer revolution in the schools.
The Library will lend software to test sites in the form of compact discs (CD-ROM) and videodiscs. Sites must furnish their own hardware.
In the first she lists more than 4,200 publications on various forms of optical technology, among them CDs (audio, interactive, interactive video, read only memory, and video), digitable video integration and digital paper, erasable discs, interactive video, and videodiscs. Chen begins the volume with a useful "Introduction to Optical Technologies" and lists of books, proceedings, reports, conferences, and journal titles on these subjects.