villous


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Related to villous: villous atrophy

villous

[′vil·əs]
(botany)
Having a surface covered with long, soft, shaggy hairs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The recognized etiologies of lymphocytic infiltration of the intestinal epithelium in the absence of villous atrophy include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors, small intestinal bacterial over growth, helicobacter pylori infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and eosinophilic gastroenteritis17.
Microscopically, the terminal villi demonstrate loss of villous capillaries with stromal fibrosis.
Multiple finger-like globular and villous fronds can be seen extending from the base of the mass.
Diet controlled placentae were significantly different from normal placentae as they showed villous immaturity, infarction, chorangiosis and syncytial knots formation when compared to normal control.
24% (Basal diet) Villous height ([micro]m) Duodenum 438 460 435 Jejunum 376 407 369 Ileum 295 318 316 Crypt depth ([micro]m) Duodenum 438 462 444 Jejunum 292 305 293 Ileum 322 332 291 Villous height to crypt depth ratio Duodenum 1.
In the article The Placental Distal Villous Hypoplasia Pattern: Interobserver Agreement and Automated Fractal Dimension as an Objective Metric, the writers propose that, because the DVH pattern seems to be simpler than comparably developed placental villi, DVH could also correlate to lower fractal dimension.
cells was higher in DM-2, and in the placental villous layer it was similar among the groups.
Due to the persistence of the symptoms the patient underwent arthroscopy of his right shoulder which demonstrated abundant yellowish villous synovial tissue in the glenohumeral region.
6 cm wide, outer surface white, sometimes pink ventrally, villous to lanate, inner surface white to yellow, glabrate; throat 9.
In affected individuals, ingestion of gluten triggers a complex inflammatory T cell-meditated immune process, eventually causing mucosal damage from the chronic inflammation, resulting in small intestinal villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, this negatively affects the absorption capability of the small intestine leading to the nutritional deficiencies found with celiac disease (Runge & Nguyen, 2010).