villous

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villous

[′vil·əs]
(botany)
Having a surface covered with long, soft, shaggy hairs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Noncoeliac enteropathy: The differential diagnosis of villous atrophy in contemporary clinical practice.
High tissue-transglutaminase antibody level predicts small intestinal villous atrophy in adult patients at high risk of celiac disease.
Akram et al (27) proposed the following 5 criteria to diagnose adult AIE, of which the first 4 are required for diagnosis: (1) adult-onset diarrhea longer than 6 weeks, (2) malabsorption, (3) specific small-bowel histology (partial/complete villous blunting, deep crypt lymphocytosis, crypt apoptotic bodies, minimal surface lymphocytosis), (4) exclusion of other causes of villous atrophy, and (5) presence of anti-enterocyte and/or antigoblet cell antibodies.
The characteristic histological features of mucosal inflammation, villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, and lymphocyte infiltration of the epithelium confirm the diagnosis (Runge & Nguyen, 2010).
Although PC21A strain replicated in cecum and colon epithelial cells, cellular necrosis and villous atrophy were not evident.
Severe villous atrophy was found in 53% of the first group, compared with only 34% of the latter, the investigators said (din.
The pathologic changes are villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia secondary to toxic prolamines.
Table 2 & 3) On jejunal biopsy, partial villous atrophy was seen in only one case while in the rest, it was normal.
The traditional diagnosis of celiac disease depends on confirmation of villous atrophy, cryptic livperplasia, or intraepithelial lymphocytosis in samples collected during small intestinal biopsy.
Microscopy reveals shortened microvilli and villous atrophy with an increased number of secretory granules within enterocytes and membrane-bound inclusions on EM without crypt hyperplasia or inflammation, which was the case in our patient.
Introduction: Celiac Disease (CD) is an immune response to ingested wheat gluten and related proteins of rye and barley that leads to inflammation, villous atrophy and intestinal crypt hyper- plasia.
Based on the clinical presentation, serology, and biopsy findings, celiac disease has been classified as classical celiac disease (dominated by gastrointestinal malabsorption), atypical celiac disease (with prominent extraintestinal symptoms and a few or no gastrointestinal symptoms), silent celiac disease (asymptomatic individuals with positive serology and villous atrophy on biopsy) and latent celiac disease (asymptomatic individuals with positive serology but normal biopsy) (5).