vindictive

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vindictive

English law (of damages) in excess of the compensation due to the plaintiff and imposed in punishment of the defendant
References in classic literature ?
Wakem was not without this parenthetic vindictiveness toward the uncomplimentary miller; and now Mrs.
After a time they were able to relax these measures, for nothing was either heard or seen of their opponent, and they hoped that time had cooled his vindictiveness.
Casaubon, we know, had a sense of rectitude and an honorable pride in satisfying the requirements of honor, which compelled him to find other reasons for his conduct than those of jealousy and vindictiveness.
He fixed his eyes again on Anne with the same devouring hatred in their look, and spoke (this time directly addressing himself to her) with the same ferocious vindictiveness in his tone.
I expected then people to be more of a piece than I do now, and I was distressed to find so much vindictiveness in so charming a creature.
As he concluded Rokoff held out his hands for the child, a nasty grin of vindictiveness upon his lips.
Her present countenance had a wild vindictiveness in its white cheek, and a bloodless lip and scintillating eye; and she retained in her closed fingers a portion of the locks she had been grasping.
The fiend-like skill we display in the invention of all manner of death-dealing engines, the vindictiveness with which we carry on our wars, and the misery and desolation that follow in their train, are enough of themselves to distinguish the white civilized man as the most ferocious animal on the face of the earth.
He was staring at her with bristling hair, recognizing her for what she was, a cat, when she sprang again, her tail the size of a large man's arm, all claws and spitting fury and vindictiveness.
he demanded, certain of her answer, a triumphant vindictiveness in his voice.
When my poor husband, her dear father, was alive, if he had ever venture'd a cross word to me, I'd have--' The good old lady did not finish the sentence, but she twisted off the head of a shrimp with a vindictiveness which seemed to imply that the action was in some degree a substitute for words.
We never ought to allow our instincts of justice to degenerate into mere vindictiveness.