vinegar bacteria

vinegar bacteria

[′vin·ə·gər bak‚tir·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
References in periodicals archive ?
When hungry little vinegar bacteria are carried by air into contact with fresh wine, they begin to consume the alcohol, leaving acid in its place.
"The generator, a large tank filled with beechwood shavings inoculated with high-strength vinegar, is a vinegar bacteria propagation ground.
If air is allowed in the container, vinegar bacteria will spoil the wine.
Choose a cool day to press your cider outside--lower temperatures reduce the risk of vinegar bacteria and just may keep those pesky yellow jackets at bay.
Utilize some of the Campden tablet solution for the water seal in the now-clean air lock; this prevents vinegar bacteria from getting into the cider while at the same time allowing carbon dioxide gas to escape during the secondary fermentation.
Repeat shaking and airing wine 2 or 3 times; this helps eliminate any harmless gas that may have been added to wine to prevent the growth of vinegar bacteria. Add 1 cup unpasteurized vinegar and 1/4 cup water (diluting the wine makes it easier for the vinegar bacteria to grow); shake to blend.