viola da gamba


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Related to viola da gamba: viola d'amore

viol

viol, family of bowed stringed instruments, the most important ensemble instruments from the 15th to the 17th cent. The viol's early history is indefinite, but it is recognizable in depictions from as early as the 11th cent. During the second half of the 17th cent. it lost its dominant position to the violin family and became practically extinct until the general revival of interest in early music and instruments in the 20th cent. The viol differs from the violin in the manner of playing, in its shape, and in having frets and typically six strings, tuned in fourths with one third, rather than in fifths. Most viols are properly played upright, resting on or between the knees, with the bow held with the palm upward. The viol usually has sloping shoulders, a flat back, and deeper ribs than the violin. It is a chamber instrument with a soft, sweet tone, incapable of the dynamic extremes and brilliance of the violin; this helps to account for its decline. The viol was built in four principal sizes—treble, alto, tenor, and bass—which were used in ensemble, or “consort.” The double-bass viol, or violone, survived all the others, becoming, with some modification, the present double bass. The bass viol was the principal solo instrument of the family, possessing a large literature from the 16th to the 18th cent. It later became known as viola da gamba [Ital.,=leg viol]—originally the name of the whole family, to distinguish them from those of the viola da bracchio (arm viol) family, the forerunners of the violin. The viola d'amore, a member of the viol family, originated in the 17th cent. and was especially popular in the 18th cent. It has from five to seven strings, tuned in thirds and fourths, and an equal number of sympathetic strings running through the bridge and under the fingerboard. Unlike most viols, it is held, like the violin, under the chin. It was and is principally a solo instrument, possessing a modest literature from all periods, including the 20th cent.
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viola da gamba

the second largest and lowest member of the viol family
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
NAOMI MATTHEW: 6.00 Wild Sauce, 6.35 Osiris Way, 7.05 Clement, 7.40 Moodhill, 8.15 Viola Da Gamba, 8.45 Fresa.
Musically, compositions tend to surf the lower end of the string spectrum, with doublebass, viola da gamba and particularly the cello featuring strongly.
Again he gets sidetracked by his relentless pursuit of definitions, arguing that the term 'violetta [...] is an instrument in the viola da gamba family' (p.
Viola Da Gamba is, conversely, the highest-rated horse in the field, having shown a good level of form as a juvenile - the highlight being a brave second at Folkestone.
Soprano Shari Alise Wilson and countertenor Gerrod Pagenkopf will perform with an ensemble that includes violins, viola, violone, harpsichord and viola da gamba.
ISTANBUL, Feb 7, 2011 (TUR) -- Friederike Heumann, a viola da gamba soloist, will give a concert in Istanbul on February 18.
Its creation took three years and the collaboration of musicians from the Ithaca College Music Department and Hospicare's music program, the Ithaca community, the Ithaca College Women's Chorale directed by Janet Galvan, members of the music faculty of Ithaca College, Nicholas Walker on double bass and viola da gamba, cellist Elizabeth Simkin, flautist Wendy Mehne, and harpists Jayne Demakos and Evangeline Ray.
Huygens studied lute, viola da gamba, and the keyboard as a child, and although most of his musical compositions are lost, he claimed to have composed almost 1000 (brief) instrumental pieces.
This is adequate for most of the manuscript and printed items, but I will admit to wishing that the viola da gamba and the lute had been photographed in color.
She has performed on the viola da gamba and has played double bass with several orchestras, including the Cleveland Philharmonic.
Howard Pepperman plays the viola da gamba and is a computer programmer.