violet


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Related to violet: mauve, gentian violet

violet,

common name for some members of the Violaceae, a family of chiefly perennial herbs (and sometimes shrubs, small trees, or climbers) found on all continents. Violets, including the genus Viola and similar related species, are popular as florists', garden, and wildflowers. Of this large group, with its fragrant blossoms ranging from deep purple to yellow or white, over 60 species are native to the United States and well over 100 varieties are offered in trade as ornamentals. Florists' violets are usually the sweet, or English, violet (V. odorata). Garden violets (often called violas) are generally hybrids and may be purple, blue, rose, yellow, white, or combinations of these, sometimes with double flowers. It became the flower of Athens; followers of Napoleon, who promised to return from Elba with violets in the spring, used the blossom as a badge; and in the United States a violet is the floral emblem of three states (New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin). The flavors of various species, particularly the sweet violet, have been used for perfume, dye, and medicine and have been candied. The common pansy was originally derived, long ago, from the Old World V. tricolor, one of several species called heartsease and Johnny-jump-up; the Eastern field pansy, a wildflower of North America, is a separate species. Some unrelated plants are also called violets, e.g., the African violet of the family Gesneriaceae (gesneria family) and the dog-toothed violet of the family Liliaceae (lily family). True violets are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Violales, family Violaceae.
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violet

violet

Another famous edible flower (including leaves) with a sweet perfumes flavor. Violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes in salads, desserts and drinks. Heart-shaped leaves with slightly serrated edges are edible, and tasty when cooked like spinach. Flowers may be deep purple, blue, pink, or white. All have 5 petals, which may have a yellow (fur) or beard on the inside of two of the petals. Whole plant is edible, including roots. Tea from whole plant used for digestive disorders and headache. (contains saliclic acid- “aspirin”). Flowers and leaves commonly used for respiratory ailments associated with congestion, coughing, and sore throat. Root powder is laxative. Taking too much of the root may cause vomiting. Plant contains eugenol, ferulic-acid, kaempferol, quercetin, scopoletin, which are used in the treatment of cancer, AIDS, arthritis, gum disease, expelling parasites and treating malignant growths. Anti-inflammatory, can be used internally and externally for pimples, abscesses, tumors, and swollen glands. Put flowers in bath. Relaxing aroma.

What does it mean when you dream about a violet?

A light shade of purple and pink, violet is regarded as a spiritual color by many religions. It symbolizes purification and illumination.

violet

[′vī·ə·lət]
(optics)
The hue evoked in an average observer by monochromatic radiation having a wavelength in the approximate range from 390 to 455 nanometers; however, the same sensation can be produced in a variety of other ways.

violet

symbol of faithfulness. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 178; Kunz, 327]

violet

of then city-state Athens. [Flower Symbolism: Brewer Note-Book, 334]

violet

of Illinois, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 630]

violet

Christian liturgical color; worn during Lent and Advent. [Color Symbolism: Jobes, 357]

violet

any of a group of colours that vary in saturation but have the same purplish-blue hue. They lie at one end of the visible spectrum, next to blue; approximate wavelength range 445--390 nanometres

violet

1. any of various temperate perennial herbaceous plants of the violaceous genus Viola, such as V. odorata (sweet (or garden) violet), typically having mauve or bluish flowers with irregular showy petals
2. any other plant of the genus Viola, such as the wild pansy
3. any of various similar but unrelated plants, such as the African violet
References in classic literature ?
said Violet, with a very satisfied tone; "and now we must have some little shining bits of ice, to make the brightness of her eyes.
And she saw Violet and Peony,--indeed, she looked more at them than at the image,--she saw the two children still at work; Peony bringing fresh snow, and Violet applying it to the figure as scientifically as a sculptor adds clay to his model.
All of a sudden, Violet cried out, loudly and joyfully,--"Look here, Peony
Oh certainly," said Violet, with tranquillity, as if it were very much a matter of course.
But, as this did not seem to make the lips quite red enough, Violet next proposed that the snow-child should be invited to kiss Peony's scarlet cheek.
she has kissed you," added Violet, "and now her lips are very red.
And with tears falling thick and fast upon their tender leaves, Violet laid the wreath at his feet, while the golden light grew ever brighter as it fell upon the little form so humbly kneeling there.
Then Violet hung the wreath above the throne, and with weary foot went forth again, out into the cold, dark gardens, and still the golden shadows followed her, and wherever they fell, flowers bloomed and green leaves rustled.
Then came the Frost-Spirits, and beneath their cold wings the flowers died, while the Spirits bore Violet to a low, dark cell, saying as they left her, that their King was angry that she had dared to stay when he had bid her go.
Thus Violet dwelt, and each day the golden light grew stronger; and from among the crevices of the rocky walls came troops of little velvet-coated moles, praying that they might listen to the sweet music, and lie in the warm light.
And Violet said, Yes; so day after day they labored to make a pathway through the frozen earth, that she might reach the roots of the withered flowers; and soon, wherever through the dark galleries she went, the soft light fell upon the roots of flowers, and they with new life spread forth in the warm ground, and forced fresh sap to the blossoms above.
The rough floor was spread with deep green moss, and over wall and roof grew flowery vines, filling the air with their sweet breath; while above played the clear, soft light, casting rosy shadows on the glittering drops that lay among the fragrant leaves; and beneath the vines stood Violet, casting crumbs to the downy little moles who ran fearlessly about and listened as she sang to them.