viral shedding


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viral shedding

[′vī·rəl ′shed·iŋ]
(virology)
Excretion of virus from a specific site in the body or from a lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The above findings cannot be directly used to correlate the length of viral shedding with factors such as vaccination status and age as specimens were not collected every day to test for presence of virus.
Additionally, culture of materials obtained from the conjunctivae, oropharynx, and any unhealed skin lesions might be performed 1 to 2 weeks after discontinuation of antiviral medication to detect viral shedding.
About 70%-80% of HSV-2 transmission occurs with asymptomatic viral shedding.
reported a 10-fold increased level of HIV RNA in the semen of patients with gonorrhea as compared to control patients and an increase in viral shedding in the semen of patients with genital ulcerative disease.
The drug will prevent exposed animals from developing clinical disease and will reduce viral shedding by PI animals until they are identified and separated from the herd.
MCPyV was also detected within this cohort, but age, frequency of detection, and lower levels of viral shedding contrasted with the findings for WUPyV, KIPyV, and MWPyV.
The timing of the appearance of Ebola viral particles in the skin and the onset of viral shedding into the environment has not been well defined to date.
Caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV 1) or type 2 (HSV2), genital herpes is a chronic, lifelong infection with nearly continuous, low-level viral shedding and intermittent clinical recurrences characterized by transmission through sexual contact.
At 2 weeks, 11 subjects still had viral shedding in saliva, as did 10 at day 20 and 2 subjects at day 28.
In ducks, some but not all vaccines decreased oropharyngeal and cloacal viral shedding for different periods postchallenge when compared with the sham group.
Elicited antibody responses in 100% of mice against the encoded antigen; -- Protected 100% of mice against subsequent challenge with a lethal dose of live virus; -- Reduced viral shedding in mice at both the primary and latent infection sites; and -- Elicited sterilizing immunity in 80% of mice as evidenced by no detectable virus after challenge at either the primary (vagina) or latent (dorsal root ganglia) infection sites.
Physician recommendations to both men and women in serodiscordant relationships that they consistently use condoms to reduce their risk of HSV-2 acquisition would have a substantial public health benefit, given the importance of asymptomatic viral shedding as a cause of HSV-2 transmission, she said.