virtual goods


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virtual goods

Images of real things that are purchased to enhance online games and social networks. For example, players can purchase elaborate avatars to represent themselves, or send an image of flowers to someone. Doll sites allow children to purchase fashionable clothes, providing the electronic equivalent of dressing physical toys. Virtual goods are infinite. Users buy land, houses, "virtually" anything in countless virtual reality games. See virtual reality and Second Life.
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virtual goods are primarily sold through third-party marketplaces.
The game provider must then do everything he can to keep the world closed: no exchange rates, no trade in virtual goods or in accounts outside the game, etc.
Hitting over $7.3 billion in sales in 2010, the virtual goods industry encompasses everything from virtual clothing to virtual farms used in online communities and gaming.
Designed in collaboration with tokidoki, LLC., Pico World will be bringing new collaborative virtual goods to allow users to express themselves online with tokidoki fashions.
One example is Facebook credits, a system that allows users to buy virtual goods on all the games across Facebook, such as the popular Mafia Wars, Evony, and Farmville.
In Second Life, virtual residents can find virtual goods, ranging from clothing to works of art, as well as virtual services ranging from business management to education and entertainment.
ABI Research senior analyst Aapo Markkanen comments, "An ever-larger share of mobile gaming revenue is coming from virtual goods and other purchases that take place within the game.
Gartner estimates consumer spending on global online gaming -- including subscriptions and micro-transactions -- will show a compound annual growth rate of 27 per cent through 2015, with consumer spending on subscription fees slightly declining while spending on virtual goods growing exponentially.
Gartner estimates consumer spending on global online gaming (subscriptions and microtransactions) will show a compound annual growth rate of 27% through 2015, with consumer spending on subscription fees slightly declining while spending on virtual goods will grow exponentially.
Facebook wanted to take a 30% cut in transactions involving its credits -- the currency Zynga players use to buy virtual goods.
market in these virtual goods is estimated by Inside Virtual Goods to be $2 billion and growing.
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