virtual height

virtual height

[′vər·chə·wəl ′hīt]
(geophysics)
The apparent height of a layer in the ionosphere, determined from the time required for a radio pulse to travel to the layer and return, assuming that the pulse propagates at the speed of light. Also known as equivalent height.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The flexibility of DTS Virtual:X and its architecture enable product manufacturers to utilize one or more features concurrently, including virtual height and virtual surround.
YousufZai, "Quantifying the seasonal variation in virtual height of ionosphere F2 layer at Pakistan atmospheric region", Journal of Information and Communication Technology, Vol.
Thus, in order to calculate the heat source plume temperature at the following layers above the PV nozzle, the virtual height z' associated with the plume temperature [T'.sub.sp,0] is calculated at the layer including the PV module] A correction factor equal to the difference between the actual height and the virtual height is introduced as (z - z').
The significant two-way interaction of visual environment and height, F(2, 46) = 14.45, p < .001, revealed that real height increased HR similarly at 3 and 9 m, whereas virtual height did not affect HR.
Participants' ME sway at real and virtual height was not significantly different (p > .05) on the firm surface and was statistically equivalent (95% CI, [+ or -] 10% range) on the deformable surface (Figure 3a).
Participants' AP sway at real and virtual height was not significantly different (p > .05) on the firm surface and was statistically equivalent (95% CI, [+ or -] 10% range) on the deformable surface.
Reflection from the ionosphere is characterized by virtual height and critical frequency.
Where D is the surface distance from the SSL to the emitter; R is the radius of the Earth; [B.sub.R] is the elevation angle, measured at the receiver; and H is the virtual height of the ionospheric layer from which the signal is reflected.
The treatment group had one pre-treatment VR equipment session and seven weekly 35- to 45-minute sessions during which they were exposed to three virtual height situations - a virtual elevator, a series of virtual bridges, and a series of virtual balconies.
The virtual height, designated h [prime], is the height at which a signal transmitted toward the ionosphere appears to be reflected (Figure 4).
As the frequency of a vertically incident transmitted signal is increased, the measured virtual height of the signal's reflection (i.e., the height within the layer at which the signal is apparently reflected) increases.
Barnett.[3] With a known transmitter range and measured elevation angles, they attempted to solve for the virtual height of the ionosphere at a time when the existence of the ionosphere had not yet been established.