viral shedding

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viral shedding

[′vī·rəl ′shed·iŋ]
(virology)
Excretion of virus from a specific site in the body or from a lesion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prolonged intermittent virus shedding during an outbreak of canine influenza A H3N2 virus infection in dogs in three Chicago area shelters: 16 cases (March to May 2015).
In our previously developed avian models, H9N2- infected 3 weeks-old chickens displayed a high level of virus shedding from trachea and cecal tonsil cells on day 5 post-infection (data not shown).
The FOA will explore the duration and infectiousness of Zika virus shedding in semen, vaginal secretions, and other body fluids, determine the risk of sexual transmission in areas both with and without local vector transmission, and evaluate factors that may facilitate sexual transmission including behavioral factors.
Efficacy of oseltamivir treatment started within 5 days of symptom onset to reduce influenza illness duration and virus shedding in an urban setting in Bangladesh: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.
Further studies are needed to determine the characteristics of Zika virus shedding in the genital tract and vaginal fluid of humans.
Swabs were submitted to virus isolation in Vero cells to detect virus shedding.
Moreover it also reduces the virus shedding and hence will help to control the disease (Patti et al.
Persons with the latent virus are a reservoir for virus shedding and transmission.
The majority of sexual HSV transmission occurs during asymptomatic periods because the patients are unaware of asymptomatic virus shedding.
Other types of vaccines can protect birds from the disease's clinical signs, but barely reduce the virus shedding in their respiratory secretions after infection.
4) Increased resistance rates are found in treated individuals with prolonged virus shedding, such as populations with an immature or compromised immune system.
The researchers also tested the impact of wearing a surgical mask on the virus shedding into airborne droplets.