viscosity curve

viscosity curve

[vi′skäs·əd·ē ‚kərv]
(fluid mechanics)
A graph showing the viscosity of a liquid or gaseous material as a function of temperature.
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Meanwhile, the varying tendencies of each viscosity curve are consistent, no matter how complex the process of the interactions about water and soil is.
Another standard is ASTM D5133, based on the Scanning Brookfield Technique (SBT) that can provide a viscosity curve from -5 to -40[degrees]C, and calculates the Gelation Index of the sample.
It is always good to run a salt viscosity curve for each formula, which can be done by adding the salt to the formula in increments of 0.2% or so.
* Section 1: To determine and plot a viscosity curve of a two-part epoxy adhesive.
This, says Milacron, allows operators to compare new or regrind material with a previously tested batch and determine parameter changes needed to obtain the same viscosity curve and flow characteristics.
This is the main point of the viscosity curve: Plastics change viscosity if you change fill time.
Additionally, it is noteworthy that both inverse equations predict almost constant slope of the viscosity curve in double-logarithmic coordinates, that is, the power-law region, for higher shear rates, while the corresponding stress dependent Kohlrausch functions have variable slopes in the whole shear stress range.
Technical value analyzed through the viscosity curve as a function of temperature (lowest slope) 100 points 50% -
With this data and with some correction factors (Weissenberg/Rabinowitsch, Schummer, Dodge/ Metzner or Reiner/Philipoff) a viscosity curve across a range of shear stresses can be measured and translated into real results.
This easy-to-use liquid yields dramatic increases in viscosity in typical surfactant systems as evidenced in the viscosity curve in Fig.